Place
Water
Energy
Health + Happiness
Materials
Equity
Beauty

 

 

Toilets

The building has composting toilets that use soap foam for "flushing." The foam flush feature is motion-activated. Follow these simple steps:

  1. Enter the stall.
  2. Hear the hum of a motor and observe the foam sliding down the sides of the toilet.
  3. Use the toilet seat cover if you must.
  4. Do your business.
  5. Use toilet paper.
  6. Do not place anything else down the toilet. 

 

Lighting Controls

The building has a smart, efficient lighting system. Lights will turn off automatically after a period of inactivity. Each room has lighting controls identified with a yellow "Lights" label. Regardless of the number of buttons, the lighting controls work as follows:

  1. Top button is automatic - sensors will determine amount of lighting needed in the room.
  2. Bottom button is off - in this mode, occupants can also use the up or down button to manually increase or decrease luminosity. 
  3. Middle buttons are pre-set brightness settings.

 

Fan Controls

The building has a unique climate control system that utilizes lots of fans. Each room has fan controls identified with a blue "Fans" label. The switch is "on" and "off" with a slider on the side that allows for speed adjustment.

 

Window Blind Controls

Rooms either have interior blinds or external blinds. Each room has window blind controls identified with a red label.

  • For interior blinds, the top button is "fully up," the middle buttons are 25% down, 50% down, and 75% down, and the bottom button is "fully down."
  • For exterior blinds, the bottom button is down and the top button is up.

 

Materials Management

The Kendeda Building seeks to maximize materials diversion from the landfill. There are three indoor receptacle stations and three outdoor receptacle stations for materials in the building. Each is labeled for plastics, aluminum, paper, compost, and landfill (i.e., trash). Two receptacle stations also accept hard-to-recycle materials (e.g., styrofoam and plastic film). Each receptacle station has pictures showing what you can discard in the corresponding bin. Refer to the Materials Management Work Plan for more details.

 

Audio / Visual

If you want to show a presentation, bring your own laptop. Only the Auditorium has a built-in computer, accessible if you have a Georgia Tech profile. All other rooms are "bring your own device." You can connect to the room projector wirelessly or via an HDMI connection (note that the Makerspace / Design Studio does not have wireless connection). If your computer does not have an HDMI port, please bring an HDMI adapter.  Also, bring your own presentation clicker / advancer / laser pointer. 

The Auditorium has a 5-channel audio system, which include one microphone attached to the podium and four handheld or lapel microphones. Each of the two classrooms have a 2-channel audio system, which include one microphone attached to the podium and one lapel microphone. All other rooms do not have audio systems. 

If you have issues with the building's A/V system, please call the A/V Services Team at 404-894-4669. Assistance is available Monday - Friday from 7am to 8pm.

 

Electricity

The building has fewer plugs, and that is by design. Bring your electronic device fully charged. 

  • Closed to the public until further notice.
  • Closed on following holidays during 2020:
    • New Year’s Day – Wednesday January 1
    • MLK Jr. Day – Monday January 20
    • Memorial Day – Monday May 25
    • Labor Day – Monday September 7
    • Thanksgiving – Thursday November 26 and Friday November 27
    • Holiday – Monday December 21 to Friday December 25

For questions regarding toilets/plumbing, lighting, waste/recycling, and building temperature, contact Marlon Ellis, mellis61@gatech.edu, 404-861-9852.

For questions about events, building timing, building access, and other issues, contact:

If you have issues with the building's A/V system, please call the A/V Services Team at 404-894-4669. Assistance is available Monday - Friday from 7am to 8pm.

Table of Contents

 

I. Introduction

The Georgia Institute of Technology has a master services agreement with Gregory Pest Solutions. In formulating this Pest Management Work Plan for The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design, Gregory Pest Solutions was provided with the Cleaning Products Procedure and Analysis Report, available here, prepared by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) for Georgia Tech. The report states that the following products are not within the scope of the Living Building Challenge and therefore may be used in The Kendeda Building:

  • Ant and Roach Killer
  • Spider and Scorpion Killer
  • Flying Insect Killer
  • Insect Repellant

 

II. Contact Information

Prior to performing pest management on The Kendeda Building site, Gregory Pest Solutions will notify Marlon Ellis, Area Six Maintenance Manager. If a building occupant notices an issue that needs resolution, then please contact Marlon Ellis:

For information regarding integrated pest management, please contact Steve Place, Horticulturist II, Facilities – Landscape Services:

 

III. List of Pest Products

Gregory Pest Solutions provided the following list of products to use on The Kendeda Building site:

  • Detex Block w/Lumitrack
    • EPA reg. #: exempt
    • Target pest(s): mice, rats
    • Application method(s): bait station
    • Area to be used: exterior
  • Terad3 AG
    • EPA reg. #: 12455-116
    • Target pest(s): mice, rats
    • Application method(s): bait station
    • Area to be used: exterior
  • EcoVia EC
    • EPA reg. #: exempt
    • Target pest(s): ants, cockroaches
    • Application method(s): crack and crevice/spot
    • Area to be used: interior/exterior
  • EcoVia WD
    • EPA reg. #: exempt
    • Target pest(s): cockroaches
    • Application method(s): crack and crevice/spot
    • Area to be used: interior/exterior
  • Essentria All Purpose Insecticide
    • EPA reg. #: exempt
    • Target pest(s): ants, cockroaches
    • Application method(s): crack and crevice/spot
    • Area to be used: interior/exterior
  • Essentria G Granular Insecticide
    • EPA reg. #: exempt
    • Target pest(s): cockroaches
    • Application method(s): crack and crevice/spot
    • Area to be used: interior/exterior

The category of botanical-based insecticides is rapidly changing. Gregory Pest Solutions may recommend other products in the future.

 

IV. Integrated Pest Management

Integrated pest management (IPM) is covered by The Kendeda Building Landscape Management and Operations Work Plan. Each year, the building’s IPM protocol is initiated in the spring and continues throughout the summer.

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design was designed and constructed to meet the requirements of the Living Building Challenge (LBC) version 3.1. The material covered in this document is intended to inform and instruct staff to operate the building to LBC standards. The document is also designed to educate stakeholders, building occupants, and visitors of key sustainable systems, as well as how they function and operate.

This work plan covers the standard operating procedures for all Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection, Vertical Transportation, and Envelope disciplines (collectively referred to as “building systems and enclosure”) within the Kendeda Building. This documentation also outlines the operations and maintenance (O&M) approach to maintaining the Kendeda Building per the design intent to meet the LBC 3.1 certification requirements.

Requirements and guidance for building systems and enclosure are found in the Energy, Water, Materials, and Health and Happiness Petals of the LBC. The Kendeda Building contains mechanical systems that will be reliable and safe while utilizing power generated only from its onsite renewable energy source. The sustainable plumbing system is designed to produce potable water using collected rainfall. The building promotes occupants’ well-being by using materials that are ecologically restorative and contain minimum amounts of pollutants.

Click here to download the Building Systems and Envelope Management Work Plan.

Table of Contents

 

I. Introduction

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is surrounded by an impressive amount of green space – ground level native and edible gardens, a greywater treatment constructed wetland at the main entrance, bioswales on the south and west side, landscaped areas on the south, west, and north sides, and a roof top garden. Every element of The Kendeda Building’s construction and operation challenged The Georgia Institute of Technology to rethink how things are “always done,” and landscaping maintenance was no exception.

Requirements for landscaping are found in the Place Petal of the Living Building Challenge (LBC) under the Limits to Growth Imperative. The Imperative states that “on-site landscape must be designed so that as it matures and evolves, it increasingly emulates the functionality of indigenous ecosystems with regard to density, biodiversity, plant succession, water, and nutrient needs” and “provide(s) wildlife and avian habitat.” Additionally, “no petrochemical fertilizer or pesticides can be used for the operation and maintenance of the on-site landscape.”

To prepare for this element of the LBC, a team, led by Georgia Tech Associate Director of Landscape Services and Fleet Services Hyacinth Ide, conducted a 12-month long pilot project to develop a plan for how landscape services will operate on The Kendeda Building grounds. Details of the pilot are available at http://livingbuilding.gatech.edu/landscaping-test-plots. This work plan is informed by the results of the pilot. It covers landscape operations and maintenance procedures for just The Kendeda Building site.

 

II. Contact Information

For information or maintenance questions, please contact Steve Place, Horticulturist II, Facilities – Landscape Services:

  • Phone: 404-376-0996
  • Email: steve.place@facilities.gatech.edu

If a building occupant notices an issue that needs resolution, then please contact Marlon Ellis, Area Six Maintenance Manager:

  • Phone: 404-861-9852
  • Email: mellis61@gatech.edu

 

III. Expectations

There will be an ongoing education of the Georgia Tech Community about The Kendeda Building landscape through partnerships with Institute Communications, building occupants, and educators on staff.

  • The site appearance may be different than other more manicured areas of campus. An education program will let campus know why – and the benefits of this program.
  • Landscape staff must also be able to serve as educators.
  • New Landscape Services employees charged with maintaining The Kendeda Building’s landscape must have traditional landscape skills. Priority will be given to hiring those with additional expertise in urban agriculture, ecology, organic farming, and the ability to teach and coordinate with campus visitors.
  • Landscape Services staff are expected to leverage volunteer students to enhance the building’s educational program. For example, Landscape Services personnel already mentor students in the Excel Program offered by Georgia Tech. The Excel Program is a four-year college program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities leading to two separate Certificates.
  • Landscape Services staff must have:
    • The ability to effectively communicate with the public regarding both the LBC and The Kendeda Building at Georgia Tech.
    • Knowledge of work procedures, including use of applicable hand tools and battery powered equipment whenever possible.
    • Knowledge of environmentally sensitive techniques.
    • Knowledge of plants on the site.
    • Knowledge of materials that meet LBC requirements.
    • Knowledge of equipment use on the site.
    • Knowledge and drive to research best practices in environmentally-friendly landscaping, and assist with updating this work plan to reflect these, as appropriate.

 

IV. List of Landscaping Products that Meet Living Building Challenge Requirements

In an effort to help Georgia Tech evaluate and update campus programs to align with the intent and requirements of the LBC, the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) worked with Georgia Tech on several research and analysis projects. These projects looked at how innovations and new procedures can carry over beneficially into whole campus activities related to LBC. One of the results of this effort was a Landscape Products Procedure and Analysis Report, available here, prepared by ILFI for Georgia Tech. This report focused on landscaping procedures and soil amendments, and evaluated the campus landscape protocol and inventoried chemicals used for landscape activities. Review of specific products noting their compliance or presence of petrochemicals is listed in the report.

Therefore, the following list of herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, fertilizers, and soil amendment products for use in The Kendeda Building have been reviewed by ILFI to determine compliance. The products labeled “meets LBC requirements” do not have any petrochemicals listed on their published ingredients list, and therefore meet the requirements of the Limits to Growth Imperative for use on site.

ILFI advises that products labeled “meets LBC requirements” may still have environmental and health hazardous properties. The suggestion is to research alternative products. The Georgia Tech team will continuously use ILFI guidelines to determine if products are made without petrochemicals and can be applied in the landscape of The Kendeda Building. It is important to note that any landscaping product labeled “organic” meets LBC requirements and may be used on site.

Herbicides
  • Fusilade (meets LBC requirements)
  • Gallery (meets LBC requirements) (pre-emergence herbicide)
  • Image (meets LBC requirements)
  • Lontrel (meets LBC requirements)
  • Q4 (meets LBC requirements)
  • Reslute (meets LBC requirements) (pre-emergence herbicide)
  • Dr. Earth Final Stop weed and grass killer (organic herbicide)
  • Avenger weed killer (organic herbicide)
  • Mirimichi pro organic weed killer (organic herbicide)
Insecticides
  • Acephate 97UP (meets LBC requirements)
    • This product is toxic to white throated sparrows and bees, and is banned for use by the US EPA on green beans. Landscape Services staff will use an alternative product whenever available.
  • Altosid (meets LBC requirements)
    • According to Georgia Tech researcher guidance, this product can be detrimental to bees. Landscape Services staff will use an alternative product whenever available.
  • Bandit (meets LBC requirements);
    • According to Georgia Tech researcher guidance, this produce is banned in the European Union. Landscape Services staff will use an alternative product whenever available.
  • Insecticidal Soap (meets LBC requirements)
  • Mosquito Dunks (meets LBC requirements)
  • Mirimichi Green Pest Control (organic insecticide)
  • Triple Action Neem Oil (organic insecticide)
Fungicides

None of the products in the current Landscape Services inventory meet LBC requirements. Therefore, the following products will be used for The Kendeda Building:

  • Dr. Earth Final Stop Disease Control Fungicide (organic fungicide)
  • Natria Disease Control by Bayer (organic fungicide)
Fertilizers
  • High Manganese Combo (liquid) (meets LBC requirements)
  • Nutragreen (liquid) (meets LBC requirements)
  • Brandt Supreme Green (liquid) (meets LBC requirements)
  • Atrimmec (liquid) (meets LBC requirements) – plant growth regulator
  • Milorganite (granular, meets LBC requirements)
  • Neptunes Harvest (granular, organic fertilizer)
  • GreenEdge (granular, organic fertilizer)
  • Nature’s Care (granular, organic fertilizer)
  • Dr. Iron (granular, organic fertilizer)
  • Bat Guano (granular, organic fertilizer)
Soil Amendment, Mulch, and Pine Straw
  • Black Kow Manure (meets LBC requirements)
  • Pine Back Mini Nuggets (meets LBC requirements)
  • Pine Straw (meets LBC requirements)
  • Nature’s Helper Soil Amendment (meets LBC requirements)
  • Black Dyed Mulch (meets LBC requirements)
  • Compost (generated on campus)
  • Mirimichi Soil Enhancer (organic soil enhancer)

 

V. Equipment

Non-combustion Landscape equipment is not a LBC requirement, but Landscape Services will use all available non-combustion equipment such as battery powered equipment whenever possible. Below is a list of the anticipated equipment that will be used at The Kendeda Building site:

  • Four blowers
  • Two electric leaf shredders, which are important for onsite composting
  • Two weed eaters
  • Two edgers
  • Two shears (one long handle)
  • Two chainsaws
  • Two mowers
  • Two golf carts
  • One truck

 

VI. Landscape Waste

Landscape waste, such as leaves and wood debris should be composted onsite, or removed to another campus locations for composting.

 

VII. Seasonal Operating Tasks

Year round activities include:

  • Cultivation
  • Soil preparation (based on soil test results)
  • Event management
  • Debris removal
  • Composting
  • Preparation for and clearing of severe weather situations

Below are the tasks that should occur throughout the year based on season.

Spring
  • Fertilization
  • Mulching
  • Planting of edible roof garden
  • Replacement plantings
  • Cultivation of soil
  • Start-up of irrigation
  • Harvesting of winter crop
  • Initiation of Integrated Pest management (IPM) protocol
Summer
  • Harvesting
  • Fertilization
  • Planting
  • Continuation of IPM
  • Dead heading
  • Watering
  • Irrigating
  • Mulching
  • Weeding
  • Pruning
Fall
  • Removing leafs
  • Hard pruning
  • Planning for new season
  • Weeding
Winter
  • Weeding
  • Mulching
  • Hard pruning
  • Shutting-down of irrigation

 

VIII. Special Events

Currently, The Kendeda Building does not require unique treatment of the landscape for special events. This is subject to continuous review based on the building’s operations and unique requirements of special events.

 

IX. Edible Landscape Management

As part of the LBC Urban Agriculture Imperative, there is an edible landscape component in the landscaping around the building and on the rooftop garden. The overall practice related to this landscape is:

  • Edible landscaping will not be promoted as a foraging landscape, but will be maintained as fit for human consumption.
  • The Landscape Services staff who manages the landscape of this building will attain Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) certification to effectively harvest the edible landscape, as needed. HACCP is a management system in which food safety is addressed through the analysis and control of biological, chemical, and physical hazards throughout the supply chain of food products.
  • The Kendeda Building team will work with food partners, such as GT Dining, to prepare harvest for donation to local food pantries or other groups, as determined by the Kendeda Building Team.

 

X. Plant List for Site

As with any garden, some of the plants on The Kendeda Building site will vary from year to year (e.g., annuals and vegetables). Below is a listing of the initial, as-built plant list for the site. This list will be updated periodically as needed.

Location Botanical Name Common Plant Name
     
Rooftop Vaccinum ashei 'Premier' Rabbiteye Blueberry
  Asclepias  tuberosa Butterfly Weed
  Boulteloua curtipendula Sideoats Grass
  Cucurbita pepo Summer Squash
  Echinacea pallida Pale Purple Coneflower
  Eupatorium hyssopfollium Hyssop Leaf Thoroughwort
  Helianthus annuus Common Sunflower
  Solidago sphaceleta, 'Golden Fleece' Goldenrod
  Sporobotus heterolepis Prairie Dropseed
  Symphyostrichum georgianum Aromatic Aster
  Zea mays L. Corn
     
Garden Trees Acer rubrum Red Maple
  Quercus alba White Oak
  Quercus rubra Red Oak
  Linodendron tulipfera Tulip Tree
  Nyssa sylvetica Tupelo
     
Garden Understory Amelanchier arborea Service Berry
  Asimina trioba Pawpaw
  Cercis canadensis Redbud
  Cornus florida Flowering Dogwood
  Magnolia tripetala Umbrella Magnolia
  Magnolia virginiana Sweet Bay Magnolia
  Malus angustfolia Southern Crab Apple
     
Garden Shrubs Caphalanthus occidentalis Bottonbush
  Clethra alnifolia Sweet Pepperbush
  Fothergilla 'Mount Airy' Dwarf Fothergilla
  Gaylussacia baccata Black Huckleberry
  Hamamelis intermedia Witch Hazel
  Hydrangea arborescens Smooth Hydrangea
  Ilex glabra Inkberry
  Ilex verticillata, 'Jim Dandy' Winter Berry
  Ilex verticillata, 'Red Sprite' Winter Berry
  Lindera benzoin Spice Bush
  Vaccinium pallidum Hillside Blueberry
     
Garden Perennials Anemone americana Roundleaf Liverwort
  Arisaema triphylium Jack in the Pulpit
  Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed
  Carex annectens Yellow Sedge
  Corex cherokeensis Bull Sedge
  Corex pensylvanica Pennsylvania Sedge
  Echinacea pellida Pale Purple Sunflower
  Eupatorium hyssopfolium Hyssop-Leaf Thoroughwort
  Gaultheria procumbens Wintergreen
  Geranium maculatum Wild Geranium
  Lobelia cardenalis Cardinal Flower
  Lysimachia terrestris Swamp Candle
  Monardia didyma Scarlet Beebalm
  Phlox paniculata Garden Phlox
  Podophylium peltatum May-Apple
  Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas Fern
  Pontederia cordata Pickerel Weed
  Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani Softstem Bulrush
  Silphium perfoliatum Cup Plant
  Solidago flexcaulis Broad Leaf Goldenrod
  Solidago sphacelata, 'Golden Fleece' Goldenrod
  Teucrium canadense American Germander
  Tiarella unifoliata Foam Flower
  Trillium cuneatum Wood Lily
  Typha latifolia Broadleaf Cattail

 

XI. Native Plants on Site

The Kendeda Building showcases the diversity of plant species native to Georgia and has been certified as a native plant habitat by the Georgia Native Plant Society. Most of the plants on the site are native to this region. Below we showcase a few of the native plants to highlight how The Kendeda Building serves the yearlong needs of our pollinators. These native species bloom in a staggered fashion from early spring to late fall.

The building’s native perennials bridge the seasons starting with the Geranium maculatum and Tiarella unifoliata, commonly known as Foam Flower.

Geranium maculatum – Wild Geranium

Wild Geranium

Tiarella unifoliata – Foam Flower

These important early season perennials support the emerging bees and pollinators while there is still a chill in the air. Both species signal the arrival of spring and are welcomed reminders that winter is near its end.

Late spring and summer are filled with Echinacea pellida, Lobellia cardenalis, and Phlox paniculata. These important pollen sources are also well known medicinal herbs. Butterflies and humming birds frequent the Lobellia cardenalis, adding colorful interaction with the deep red flowers.

Echinacea pallida – Purple Coneflower

Lobellia cardenalis – Cardinal Flower

 

Autumn at The Kendeda Building promises to be just as vibrant as the other seasons. Solidago flexccaulis blooms when many plants are beginning their preparations for winter after a long summer. Tall and brilliantly colored yellow flowers draw pollinators from across the landscape. The Kendeda Building will be a landscape in motion. Complex relationships will unfold every day, some very simple, others far more serious. The Kendeda Building will provide an open air theater, filled with beauty and drama as only a garden can provide.

Solidago flexcaulis – Broadleaf Goldenrod

Coming Soon

Table of Contents

Appendix A: List of Non-Paper Products
Appendix B: List of Labratory Products

 

I. Introduction 

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices, as well as materials disposal that promote and encourage the use of environmentally and socially responsible products and practices. This work plan establishes a sustainable purchasing program for items purchased for use in the building, as well as details on resource recovery, i.e., the collection of recyclables and compostable food scraps, and disposal.

Requirements for materials management are found in the Materials Petal of the Living Building Challenge under the Net Positive Waste Imperative, which states that that “the project team must strive to reduce or eliminate the production of waste during design, construction, operation, and end of life in order to conserve natural resources and to find ways to integrate waste back into either an industrial loop or a natural nutrient loop.” For its operation phase, every project must have a collection plan for consumables and durables. Moreover, there must be dedicated infrastructure for resource recovery.

While not directly covering the purchase of items covered by this Materials Management Work Plan, the Red List Imperative and Living Economy Sourcing Imperative provide philosophical guidance that influenced this work plan. This work plan promotes purchasing policies that conserve resources, energy, and water; minimize the harmful environmental effects of pollution and toxicity; improve environmental health; support recycling markets and reusability; reduce landfill waste; support local suppliers; and educate through environmental stewardship and leadership during the operational phase of the building.

There are other work plans for the purchase and management of the following products:

 

II. Contact Information

For general information regarding building operations and maintenance, custodial services, and servicing of bins, please contact Marlon Ellis, Area Six Maintenance Manager:

For specifics regarding resource recovery, i.e., the collection of recyclables and compostable items, contact the Office of Solid Waste Management & Recycling (OSWM&R) at (404) 385-0088.

Below are contacts for materials management procedures for specific spaces in the building.

Office Space, Design Studio/Makerspace, Auditorium, Classrooms, Seminar Room, and Conference Rooms

Kamilah Roberts, Program Support Coordinator

Laboratories

Juan Archila, Research Scientist II

Special Events

Kamilah Roberts, Program Support Coordinator

Landscape Supplies and Equipment

Refer to the Landscape Operations and Maintenance Work Plan.

Custodial Supplies and Equipment

Refer to the Green Cleaning Work Plan.

Pest Control Supplies and Equipment

Refer to the Pest Management Work Plan.

 

III. Expectations

  • The execution of this work plan requires coordination across multiple departments, e.g., OSWM&R, Building Services, Landscape Services, and College of Sciences. Each department commits to executing its portion of this work plan, e.g., purchasing, based on protocols enumerated in this work plan. Staff from the multiple departments that manage materials in The Kendeda Building will seek approval from the Building Director prior to making changes to bins, deviating from this work plan, or conducting waste audits in the building.
  • The Building Director will establish and lead a committee to maintain and update supply purchasing guidelines and resource recovery protocol detailed in this work plan. It is envisioned that the members of this committee will:
    • Meet quarterly;
    • Analyze spending on supplies for The Kendeda Building to gain an understanding of the building’s operating expenses and identify opportunities for savings;
    • Conduct market assessments as needed and engage suppliers to determine the availability of viable and innovative procurement options;
    • Seek disclosure of relevant sustainability information from suppliers, leveraging shared or existing data where available, and communicating preferences for innovative sustainability solutions;
    • Advise on requirements for training of purchasing staff, users of goods and services, and/or suppliers based on sustainability considerations;
    • Identify opportunities for continuous improvement of the work plan; and
    • Prepare an annual summary that contains details of spending, effectiveness of the work plan, and any improvements made through the year.
  • The Office of Campus Sustainability will contribute lessons learned from this program to the broader community of professionals working to promote sustainable purchasing. This could include sharing in annual reports, case studies to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s portal, and the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council.

 

IV. Supply Purchasing

 
Paper Products

All paper products will meet the following standards:

  • 100% recycled printer and copier paper.
  • Other paper products that contain the highest recycled content available.
Non-Paper Products

Buyers will purchase products such as non-paper office products that contain the highest post-consumer content available, but no less than the minimum recycled content standards established by the US EPA. Note that EPA’s recommendations do not preclude procuring agencies from purchasing non-paper office products made from the materials manufactured using other materials, such as wood or cloth. EPA simply recommends that procuring agencies, when purchasing non-paper office products made from the materials designated in the procurement guidelines, purchase these products containing recovered materials.

Buyers will purchase remanufactured products, such as toner cartridges, whenever practicable, but without reducing safety, quality, or effectiveness. Buyers will also reduce or eliminate use of products that contribute to the formation of dioxins and furans by prohibiting purchase of products that contain or are packing in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) such as office binders and other supplies.

See Appendix A for a list of non-paper products and associated standards for each item.

Electronic Equipment

Personnel from multiple departments sit in The Kendeda Building Office. The purchase of staff computers, monitors, and associated peripherals, and other information and communication technology (ICT) equipment is managed by each department’s Information Technology unit. The Building Director will encourage The Kendeda Building office occupants to request the purchase of personal computers, notebook computers, and monitors that meet at least the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Bronze rating level, with a preference for Silver or Gold rating.

For all ICT equipment not currently rated according to EPEAT standards, such as computer servers, printers, routers, the Building Director will encourage the purchase of options that minimize levels of toxic components, ensure the highest level of energy efficiency, incorporate recycled content, facilitate end-of-life recycling, and/or minimize unnecessary packaging.

For product categories where an EPEAT standard is in development, now or in future, once a product standard and registration process is in force, all products shall meet the minimum relevant EPEAT standard.

Coffee Cart Products

While The Kendeda Building does not currently have a coffee cart, when it does, the following supply purchasing guidelines will apply:

  • All service ware purchased by the coffee cart vendor must be designated as a certified compostable product.
  • All plant based plastics should be purchased in a green color to facilitate disposal.
  • All condiments will be purchased and displayed in bulk containers, no single use packages will be made available.
  • Cleaning products must adhere to Living Building Challenge standards as defined in the Green Cleaning Work Plan.
Makerspace / Design Studio Products

The makerspace / design studio will have a 3D printer. The filament used in the 3D printer will be made from cornstarch.

Laboratory Products

Instructors will review all laboratory chemicals against the Red List. If any are not in compliance the instructor will have to demonstrate there is not a suitable alternative. Compliance with the Red List for lab chemicals is a voluntary action and not a requirement of the Living Building Challenge.

See Appendix B for equipment that should be purchased; instructors will search for sustainable products where appropriate but are not required to meet any standards under the Living Building Challenge.

Special Events Products

 

V. Resource Recovery

Composting and recycling bins are present throughout the interior and exterior of the building. Composting and recycling bins are serviced by different departments based on waste stream and their location in the building. The information below provides details regarding which waste materials are collected in the building, how waste materials are collected in the various spaces types, i.e., restrooms, common spaces, etc., and images of the collection bins that are used in the building.

Recoverable Materials

Aluminum

  • Aluminum cans only.
  • No aluminum foil, trays, etc.
  • Aluminum can bins are serviced by OSWM&R staff.

Batteries

  • Batteries are collected by Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) personnel on an as needed basis after being notified by The Kendeda Building Director.

Cardboard

  • Only cardboard with a wavy middle layer.
  • Paperboard, such as cereal boxes, should be placed in the mixed paper bin.
  • Boxes should be broken down flat.
  • Corrugated cardboard is picked up from the loading area by OSWM&R staff.

Compostable Materials

  • Food scraps.
  • Paper-based and certified compostable food packaging.
  • Paper towels and napkins.
  • Compost bins are serviced by Building Services
  • Compost vendor is local and compost is returned to local, community gardens.
  • Landscape waste – see Landscape Operations and Maintenance Work Plan.

Confidential Materials

  • OSWM&R will pick up documents that need to be shredded by request.

Electronics

Food Recovery

Furniture

Glass

  • Clear, green, and brown glass bottles and jars only.
  • No laboratory glass.
  • Glass bins are serviced by OSWM&R staff on Tuesdays.

Mixed Metals

Mixed Paper

  • Mixed paper includes Office paper (all colors):
    • Magazines
    • Newspapers
    • Junk mail
    • File folders
    • Catalogs
    • Brochures
    • Paperback books
    • Adhesive notes
    • Paperboard (such as cereal boxes)
  • OSWM&R staff empties the recycling bins.

Pallets

  • Pallets are picked up from the designated spot in the loading area on Fridays.

Plastic

  • Rigid plastic bottles and containers only.
  • No plastic film, plastic bags, or polystyrene foam.
  • Plastic bins are serviced by OSWM&R staff.

Plastic Film

  • Plastic film is collected by OSWM&R and brought to the Center for Hard to Recycle Materials, a local hard to recycle vendor.

Styrofoam

  • Styrofoam is collected by the OSWM&R and brought to the Center for Hard to Recycle Materials, a local hard to recycle vendor.

Toner Cartridges

Uncategorized

These are materials for which Georgia Tech does not currently have a recycling program. Examples of acceptable items include:

  • Aluminum Foil
  • Plastic Film
  • Styrofoam

These items will be OSWM&R and brought to the Center for Hard to Recycle Materials. Waste streams from the Makers Space / Design Studio will be monitored to determine whether they can be recycled or reused.

Responsibility Matrix

The following is an overview how servicing various streams falls under different departments on campus:

Waste/Recycling Steam Responsible Department
Trash – Indoor Building Services
Compost – Indoor Building Services
Metals – Indoor OSWM&R
Plastics – Indoor OSWM&R
Paper – Indoor OSWM&R
Hard To Recycle – Glass, Batteries, Styrofoam, Plastic Film OSWM&R
Trash – Outdoor Landscape Services
Compost – Outdoor Landscape Services
Plastics – Outdoor OSWM&R
Metals – Outdoor OSWM&R
Batteries Building Director

Those groups identified as the responsible party above are also in charge of the weight of materials onsite, with the exception of compost and hard to recycle materials, which will be weighed by the vendor. Staff from the responsible department listed above will provide a monthly weight total for the waste/recycling streamt to the building’s Program Support Coordinator for tracking purposes.

Bins by Space Type / Event

The Coffee Cart

While The Kendeda Building does not currently have a coffee cart, when it does thre will be a composting bin for food scraps and coffee grounds.

Restrooms

  • Composting bins
    • Composting bins for paper towels are located in the restrooms.
    • Building Services staff empty the restroom composting bins daily and place the materials in the designated larger bins located in the loading area.
    • The composting bins in the loading area are serviced by a third party vendor.
  • Trash cans
    • Trash cans are emptied daily by Building Services staff.

Common Spaces 

There are three designated waste, recycling, and composting stations in the building. Two collect:

  • Landfill
  • Plastics
  • Metals
  • Compost
  • Paper
  • Hard to recycle items

One station collects all the above except hard to recycle items.

A designated waste, recycling, and composting stations in the building. This station also accepts
hard to recycle products and coffee waste.

A designated waste, recycling, and composting stations in the building.

Individual Work Stations

There are no bins at workstations.

Outdoor Waste and Recycling Stations

Outdoor waste and recycling stations contain landfill, plastics, aluminum, and compost containers. These bins (2 in total) are serviced by the Landscape Services team.

One of two outdoor waste and recycling stations.

Liquid Coffee Station

  • Container for liquid.
  • Container for coffee cups, recycled in the paper recycling stream.
  • Container for plastic lids, recycled in the plastics recycling stream.

The liquid coffee station.

Liquid coffee station.

Special Events

 

Appendix A: List of Non-Paper Products
Non-paper Office Product Materials Recovered Post-consumer Recovered Content Total Recovered Content
Recycling Containers and Waste Receptacles Plastic

 

 

20-100% -
  Steel 16% 25-30%
  Paper – Corrugated 25-50% 25-50%
  Paper – Solid Fiber Boxes 40% -
  Paper – Industrial Paperboard 40-80% 100%
Desktop Accessories (desk organizers, sorters, trays, and memo, note, and pencil holders) Plastic 25-80% -
Binders Plastic-covered - 25-50%
  Paper-covered 75-100% 90-100%
  Pressboard 20% 50%
  Solid Plastic – High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) 90% 90%
  Solid Plastic - Polyethylene 30-50% 30-50%
  Solid Plastic – Polyethylene Terephthalate 100% 100%
  Solid Plastic – Misc. 80% 80%
Trash Bags Plastic 10-100% -
Toner Cartridges

EPA recommends the return of used toner cartridges for remanufacturing and reuse or purchasing a remanufactured or recycled-content replacement cartridge

Printer Ribbons

EPA recommends the procurement of printer ribbon re-inking or reloading services, or re-inked or reloaded printer ribbons.

Plastic Envelopes Plastic    
Plastic Clipboards HDPE    
Plastic File Folders HDPE    
Plastic Clop Portfolios HDPE    

 

Appendix B: List of Laboratory Products
Equipment / Supplies Description #  Plan to Reuse Plan to Repurchase Plug In Battery Rechargeable Battery
3-hole punch Any type 1 x        
3-ring binders 0.5-1" 3-ring binders any type 4 x        
API aquarium test strips pk of 25 in a small plastic tube 6   x      
Apples Or other fruit/vegetable food waste to feed mealworms 12   x      
Balance Analytical Ohaus Adventurer analytical balance (0.1mg) 2 x   x    
Balance Top loading Ohaus Scout Portable SPX 440g (0.01g) 4 x   x x  
Bean bags Plastic fabric-like material 4" squares 50 x        
Binder clips Medium 25 x        
Binoculars Bushnell NatureView 10x42 10 x        
Biohazard waste boxes Provided by EHS 2x2x2 ft red plastic bag liner 1   x      
Books Field Guides 50 x        
Broken glass container Cardboard, plastic bag lined for broken glass 12x12x27" 1 x        
Broom and dust pan Any type, for cleaning dirt and sand off the lab floor 1 x        
Buckets Home Depot for field work and to store substrates 10 x        
Calculators Scientific calculators 10 x     x x
Calipers Plastic fine calipers 3 x        
Camera GoPro Hero6 Black and accessories 4 x       x
Camera Fuji FinePix XP120 1 x       x
Camera Video Handycam FDRAX53 ultra HD 2 x       x
Canopy Densiometer Spherical concave densiometer 4 x        
Carboy Nalgene carboy 10-20L 1 x        
Cart rolling Lakeside #3 Heavy duty metal 1 x        
Centrifuge tubes 50 ml disposable plastic centrifuge tubes 50pk - plan to reuse 1 x        
Chemical spray bottle Several gallons, hand pump spray, used for water only 1 x        
Chick crumbles 20lb commercial baby chicken food for mealworms paper bag 1   x      
Clickers Metal or plastic hand counters 16 x        
Clinometer Plastic protractor with straw, string, and metal nut 6 x        
Clipboards Standard plastic clipboards 12 x        
Compostable pots Jiffy brand 3.5" 18pk come in plastic holder 8   x      
Corer Metal soil core hand tool 2 x        
Data Collection System Lab Quest 2 Vernier, accessories and sensors 4 x       x
Dice 6 and 12 sided plastic 75 x        
Dish drying rack Plastic coated wire with plastic tray kitchen dish rack 2 x        
Dish soap Any type 1   x      
Dissolved Oxygen Meter YSI Digital professional series ProODO Portable 1 x     x  
Drawstring bags 7" by 5" velvety 25 x        
Dry beans Grocery store bags of dry beans 3 x        
Dry erase cloth Microfiber cloth reusable 1 x        
Dry erase markers Various colors 6   x      
Duct tape Standard duct tape any type 1   x      
Equipment cases Large   1 x        
Equipment cases Medium 20"x15.5"x7" 1 x        
Equipment cases Small 15"x12"x6.7" 6 x        
Eye droppers Rubber and glass 12 x        
Fertilizers Osmocote, miracle gro, phosphate and others 4   x      
First aid kit Med sized, will be taken into the field 1   x      
Flagging tape Bright color plastic flagging tape 4   x      
Forceps Metal tweezers various sizes 13 x        
Fork Garden fork hand tool 4 x        
Funnels Small and medium plastic funnels 6 x        
Glass dishes Pyrex-like medium sized glass dishes, few with plastic lids 12 x        
Glass media bottles 250 ml to 2L Pyrex with plastic lids 10 x        
Glass petri plates Reusable glass to replace plastic 6 x        
GPS Garmin GPS76 Marine Navigator 7 x     x  
GPS Beacon Receiver MBX-3S CSI wireless with nylon backpacks 2 x        
Graduated cylinders 1L and 100 ml 4 x        
Gravel Bucket of gravel 1 x        
Grocery bags Reusable cloth grocery bags 6 x        
Hand soap Antimicrobial preferred 1   x      
Hand lenses Metal frame, glass magnifiers on nylon lanyards 4 x        
Humidity / Temp Sensor Extech Instruments IR thermometer + humidity meter RH101 1 x     x  
Hydroponic growing medium Bucket of clay pellets 1 x        
Ice cube trays Plastic ice cube trays 6 x        
Incubator Fisher Scientific Isotemp Model 637D 1 x   x    
Insect collection Shadow box, dozen plastic tubes 1 x        
Insect spray Option for students and TA field use any type 1   x      
Kimwipes Boxes of laboratory tissues 2 x        
Lab coats For TA and instructor use various sizes and materials 6 x        
Lab pens Chemical resistant permanent fine markers 12   x      
Lab tape large Laboratory tape 3" core 0.5-1" wide 2   x      
Lab tape small Laboratory tape 1" core 0.5-1" wide 6   x      
Label stakes Small plastic label stakes pk of 25 2 x        
Laminated paper guides Stream guides 50          
LaMotte Biopaddles Total coliform test kit 10pk 2   x      
Lanyard Nylon (probably) cord with metal clasp 32 x        
Lens paper Microscope lens cleaning paper pads 3   x      
Light Meter LI-COR Light Meter Li-250A 3 x     x  
Long handle scoop Metal scoop used to transfer dry material to balances 2 x        
Magnifying glasses Small 3-4" Carolina brand 10 x        
Marker pens Sharpie black marker type 6   x      
Mesh Fine plankton size mesh by the yard 5 x        
Metal trays Painted metal trays 3 x        
Meter Tapes Compact 10-15m 6 x        
Meter Tapes Large 50 m length 5 x        
Micropipette tips Plastic disposable in plastic boxes of 96 20   x      
Micropipettes Gilson p1,000, p200, p20 set 4 x        
Microscope Compound Leica DM500 LED 16 x   x    
Microscope Compound Leica DM750 LED with camera ICC@50 2 x   x    
Microscope Dissecting Olympus SZ51 with dark field base illumination 8 x   x    
Microscope slide cover slips Plastic disposable boxes of 100 2   x      
Microscope slides Plain glass reusable slides boxes of 100 2 x        
Microscope slides prepared Plastic box containing 12 prepared specimen slides 5 x        
Modular plastic hoops Colored plastic units that fit together 60 x        
Multimeter YSI 63 pH Salinity Conductivity Temp Model 63-10FT 1 x     x  
Nested cup sets Metric measuring cup sets to 1L set of 5 7 x        
Net D-Frame D-Frame dip net small 2 x        
Net Insect BugDorm brand telescopic handle 2 x        
Net Kick Large Invertebrate Kick Nets, various mesh sizes, long handles 7 x        
Net Plankton LaMotte small nets 5in x 15in 153um 3 x        
Net Plankton Rectangular opening 363um 1 x        
Net Plankton Watermark Plankton Nets 150um 3 x        
Net Plankton Watermark Plankton Nets 80um 3 x        
Net Surber Wildlife Supply Stream bottom sampler 12x12" 1 x        
Net Tri Triangle Shaped Invertebrate dip nets 2 x        
Nitrate Meter Hanna Checker ultra low range nitrate meter Marine HI764 1 x     x  
Nitrile gloves Disposable gloves - rarely used 4 boxes each size S,M,L,XL 16   x      
Paint brushes Small natural and artificial hair 19 x        
Paint pens Pack of 12 assorted colors 12   x      
Paper Various sheets of paper - guides and handouts 100 x        
Paper badge insert ID sized paper badge reused term to term 32 x        
Parafilm Roll 1   x      
Phosphate Meter Hanna Checker low range phosphate meter Marine/Freshwater HI713 1 x     x  
Ping pong balls To measure stream velocity, attached to string 6 x        
Pipet pumps 10 ml green hand pump 12 x        
Pitfall traps Plastic drinking cup, plastic funnel, plastic roof, metal stakes 12 x        
Plant light cart Plant cart 3-tier LED 40 watts total (functional without power) 2 x   x    
Plastic 32oz lidded container Gladware sealable plastic container 15 x        
Plastic badge holder Clear plastic reusable 32 x        
Plastic bin Meal worm colony home, 24"W 6"H x 16"D with lid 1 x        
Plastic poker chips Packs of 100 8 x        
Plastic tanks Deep reusable plastic tanks 12"x8"x8' 14 x        
Radio - Walkie Talkie Uniden Two-way radios with charger 2 x       x
Radio - Walkie Talkie Uniden Two-way radios with charger Model RC6248 1 x       x
Radish seeds Cherry belle from Harris seeds 1,000pk 2   x      
Refractometer Salt Salinity 0-100 ppt 1 x        
Rolling step Rubbermaid movable step up to reach high shelves 1 x        
Rubber boots Variety of sizes 24+ x        
Rubber field gloves Variety of sizes Reusable 8 x        
Rulers Plastic 12 inch rulers 8 x        
Safety glasses TA and instructor use 6 x        
Safety pins Small 100 x        
Sampling containers Reusable plastic 50-200ml for water samples 50 x        
Sand Bag of play sand reused 1 x        
Scissors Any type 6 x        
Scoopulas Metal scoop used to transfer dry material to balances 6 x        
Secchi Disk Secchi disk on rope 3 x        
Sedgwick counting cells Reusable plastic microscope counting cell 6 x        
Serological pipets 10 ml Glass - can clean and reuse pk of 100 2 x        
Sidewalk chalk Multicolor pk of 20 2   x      
Sieve Set Plastic stacked sieve set 1 x        
Sieve set Set of 6 plastic with metal mesh sieves in different sizes 1 x        
Soil 32QT bag of soil 1   x      
Sponge Standard kitchen sponge for cleaning 2   x      
Spoon Metal kitchen spoon 11 x        
Spot plates Ceramic and glass 22 x        
Staplers Staples 2 x        
Stop watches Battery powered 6 x     x  
Strainers Metal kitchen strainer 6" 5 x        
String Roll of nylon string brightly colored 2 x        
Sunscreen Option for students and TA field use any type 1   x      
Temperature IR Nubee handheld IR thermometer 1 x     x  
Temperature Probe Cooper-Atkins waterproof digital pocket thermometer 6 x     x  
Temperature Sensor Fisher Traceable Memory Thermometer Cat # 15-077-8D 1 x     x  
Test strips Many different types of strips in plastic containers 6   x      
Thermometers Glass red liquid filled 2 x        
Towel strips Rags reusable 12 x        
Tripour beakers Plastic reusable 12 x        
Trowels Small hand trowels 8 x        
Tube cleaners Plastic bristle wire brushes to clean glassware various sizes 4 x        
Water and soil test kits LaMotte, plastic boxes, plastic reagent bottles, etc. 12 x        
Waders Chest waders, variety of sizes 16 x        
Water Sampler Van Dorn WildCo Alpha Bottle 2.2L Horizontal P/N 1120-H45 3 x        
Water Sampler Van Dorn WildCo small Bottle ~1L Horizontal 7500-B20 1 x        
Water spray bottles Plastic standard 4 x        
Water squirt bottle Laboratory bottles 3 x        
Weigh boats Plastic - reusable or not pk of 50 3 x        
Wheat seeds Organic from whole foods by the pound 1   x      
Wooden applicators One box Fisherbrand 6" small sticks 100 x        
Yard sticks Wooden 1m sticks 6 x        
Zip ties Various sizes 100   x      
Ziploc bags Various sizes 20   x      
 

Table of Contents

 

I. Introduction

The Georgia Institute of Technology has a robust green cleaning program managed by Building Services for the entire campus. In the early 2000s when few institutions were considering the harmful impacts of traditional cleaning products, Georgia Tech was systematically removing toxic chemical cleaners and replacing them with healthier and more environmentally-friendly products. Our first-state green cleaning implementation occurred in 2003 with the replacement of toxic chemical cleaners with more environmentally friendly products.

Since then, Georgia Tech Building Services has dramatically expanded our green cleaning program. For example, our campus-wide green cleaning approach includes Geneon Water Based Cleaning System’s ionized water, which is also known as engineered water. Visit Georgia Tech’s Green Cleaning website for additional details: https://facilities.gatech.edu/green-cleaning.

Requirements for green cleaning are found in the Health + Happiness Petal of the Living Building Challenge under the Heathy Interior Environment Imperative. The Imperative states that to promote good indoor air quality, a project must “outline a cleaning protocol that uses cleaning products that comply with the EPA Safer Choice label.”

In an effort to help Georgia Tech evaluate and update campus programs to align with the intent and requirements of the Living Building Challenge (LBC), the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) worked with Georgia Tech on several research and analysis projects. These projects looked at how innovations and new procedures can carry over beneficially into whole campus activities related to LBC. One of the results of this effort was a Cleaning Products Procedure and Analysis Report, available here, prepared by ILFI for Georgia Tech. This report focuses on green cleaning and evaluated the campus cleaning protocol and inventoried chemicals used for housekeeping activities.

The majority of The Kendeda Building’s green cleaning operations and procedures can be found in the campus-wide Green Cleaning Manual. Please refer to the campus-wide Green Cleaning Manual for specifics regarding green cleaning policy, green cleaning produces, safe handling procedures, staff and training, and quality assurance. This work plan details policies for The Kendeda Building that are above-and-beyond of what is listed in the campus-wide Green Cleaning Manual. This work plan is informed by Georgia Tech’s years of green cleaning experience as well as ILFI’s Cleaning Products Procedure and Analysis Report.

 

II. Contact Information and Custodial Support

If a building occupant notices an issue that needs resolution, then please contact Marlon Ellis, Area Six Maintenance Manager:

The Kendeda Building is supported by two members of the Georgia Tech Building Services Custodial Staff. One individual supports the building from 7am to 3pm. The other individual supports the building from 2:30pm to 10:30pm.

 

III. Purchasing Requirements for The Kendeda Building

A minimum of 100% of all annual purchases of cleaning products must meet 1 or more of the following standards for the appropriate category:

  • EPA Safer Choice label: General purpose, bathroom, glass and carpet cleaners used for industrial and institutional purposes
  • EPA Safer Choice label: Cleaning and Degreasing compounds
  • EPA Safer Choice label: Hard Surface Cleaners
  • EPA Safer Choice label: Carpet and Upholstery Care

Disinfectants, metal polish, floor finishes, strippers or other products not addressed by the above standards must meet 1 or more of the following standards for the appropriate category:

  • EPA Safer Choice label: Industrial and Institutional Floor Care Products
  • EPA Safer Choice label: digestion additives for cleaning and odor control
  • EPA Safer Choice label: Drain or grease trap additives
  • EPA Safer Choice label: Odor control additives
  • EPA Safer Choice label -1: Hard Floor Care

To identify products that meet these requirements, refer to the following website: www.epa.gov/saferchoice. Furthermore, refer to the ILFI Cleaning Products Procedure and Analysis Report for a list of alternate cleaning product options, which ILFI has confirmed as compliant with the Safer Choice program and Living Building Challenge.

NOTE: For disinfecting currently we are using Covid-19 EPA disinfectant that is the hypochlorous solution not ionized. See website: https://www.annihilare.com.

 

IV. Geneon Water Based Cleaning System

The Geneon Water Based Cleaning System creates ionized water, which is also known as engineered water. The process utilizes a device that emits an electrical charge to energize a mixture of tap water and natural minerals to create a powerful cleaner, degreaser, and sanitizer. It is an on demand, on-the-go way to clean that does not require a chemical-related health warning label. The technology was tested for sanitizing effectiveness by the EPA and found to kill more than 99.9999999% of most harmful germs and has an EPA Hospital grade registration number. Certified by the Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI) for its cleaning effectiveness, engineered water has replaced disinfectant, sanitizer, general purpose cleaner, glass, chrome and mirror cleaner, and stainless steel cleaner on campus.

In its Cleaning Products Procedure and Analysis Report, ILFI states that the Geneon Water Based Cleaning System is not within the scope of the Living Building Challenge and therefore may be used in The Kendeda Building.

 

V. Green Cleaning Procedures

Unlike other buildings on campus, The Kendeda Building has a greywater cleaning system that uses an onsite constructed wetland. The Kendeda Building’s greywater is collected from shower drains, sink drains, and water fountains to a primary tank. The greywater is pumped up to a constructed wetland at the main entrance, gravity fed to other filtration and disinfection tanks, and ultimately allowed to infiltrate back into the soil via leach fields at the north end of the site for groundwater recharge.

To protect the vegetation in the constructed wetland, no cleaning products will be dumped down the drain of The Kendeda Building. Any unused cleaning supplies will be carried to another building for disposal.

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All The Best!
The Kendeda Building
for Innovative Sustainable Design

Petal: Place
Imperative 02: Urban Agriculture
 
Rooftop Garden

Like most spaces in The Kendeda Building, the rooftop garden serves many purposes and helps contribute to the building’s performance. The approximately 5,000 square foot rooftop garden consists of a honeybee apiary, pollinator garden, blueberry orchard, and a laboratory. These elements help satisfy the Urban Agriculture Imperative requirement while simultaneously offering valuable curriculum and research opportunities. 

As with most rooftop gardens, The Kendeda Building contains catchments to help manage rainwater runoff. It also helps mitigate the urban heat island effect by reducing the amount of heat radiated back into the surrounding area. The PV array overhangs onto the rooftop garden providing occupants with shade thereby extending its use into more months of the year.

The Kendeda Building provides a model for sustainable and productive infrastructure that supports pollinators and pollinator habitat conservation awareness. The Georgia Tech Urban Honey Bee Project is an interdisciplinary undergraduate research and education program focused on the impact of urban habitats on honey bees. This unique program has located their hives on The Kendeda Building rooftop garden

 

The Kendeda Building's rooftop garden is a place for research, relaxation, and reflection. The Kendeda Building's rooftop garden is a place for research, relaxation, and reflection., The rooftop garden's soil is also part of the rainfall management system. The rooftop garden's soil is also part of the rainfall management system.
Jennifer Leavey PhD (center), the Director of the Georgia Tech Urban Honey Bee Project, with project partners. Jennifer Leavey PhD (center), the Director of the Georgia Tech Urban Honey Bee Project, with project partners.
Petal: Beauty
Imperative 20: Inspiration + Education
 
A Flexible Auditorium

The Kendeda Building is a multi-disciplinary, non-departmental education building. Rather than focus on one subject such as physics or ecology, the design team envisioned a building that welcomes the broadest cross section of students. The goal is to have as many students circulate through the building as possible so that they can be inspired by its regenerative design.  

The auditorium, which seats 176 persons in classroom layout, was strategically designed to provide maximum flexibility for uses. It is large enough to allow for the teaching of intro-level classes in topics as varied as economics, chemistry, biomedical engineering, and calculus (a required course for all Georgia Tech students).

It also hosts lectures, symposia, networking events, and workshops. The entrance of the auditorium features a large "garage door" that when opened allows for events to spill into the atrium. While many of these events are related to sustainability, some further the Equity Petals' ethos by ensuring that a variety of interests are accommodated in the space.

The 176-person auditorium configured in classroom layout. The 176-person auditorium configured in classroom layout., Georgia Tech Society of Women Engineers networking night with mentors. Georgia Tech Society of Women Engineers networking night with mentors., Members of Georgia Tech's Muslim community participating in Friday prayers. Members of Georgia Tech's Muslim community participating in Friday prayers.
Petal: Equity
Imperative: None; the team implemented its own Equity ethos
 
Workforce Development

While the project meets all the required Imperatives for the Equity Petal, the project team thought more broadly about how The Kendeda Building could further equity in the built environment. The team decided to partner with Georgia Works!, a non-profit program that trains and employs economically disadvantaged residents of Atlanta. The exposed wood floor/ceiling assembly, which is a key design feature of the building, was constructed largely by six Georgia Works! personnel. This provided them with valuable on-the-job training that helped them move their lives forward.

Georgia Works! personnel helped construct 489 panels that became an integral part of the building. Georgia Works! personnel helped construct 489 panels that became an integral part of the building., The exposed wood floor/ceiling assembly serves as a constant reminder that we can and should do more to advance equity in the built environment. The exposed wood floor/ceiling assembly serves as a constant reminder that we can and should do more to advance equity in the built environment.

Petal: Equity

Imperative 16: Universal Access to Nature & Place

 

Access For All Occupants

The Living Building Challenge envisions communities that allow equitable access and treatment to all people regardless of physical abilities, age, or socioeconomic status. The Kendeda Building is designed for universal access to and throughout the site and the building for all occupants. For example, the ramp is in the center of the building, directly adjacent to the stairs thereby ensuring that all people have similar experiences throughout the project.

Georgia Tech extended this equitable access ethos to the types of classes taught and events held in the building. The design team envisioned a building that is welcoming to the broadest cross section of the community. The goal is to have as many people circulate through the building as possible so that they can be inspired by its regenerative design.

 

The building's ramp is intentionally in the center of the atrium, providing easy access for all people. The building's ramp is intentionally in the center of the atrium, providing easy access for all people., Queer Hispanic Heritage Panel held in a classroom and hosted by Pride Alliance at Georgia Tech. Queer Hispanic Heritage Panel held in a classroom and hosted by Pride Alliance at Georgia Tech.
Petal: Materials
Imperative 14: Net Positive Waste

 
Preserving Georgia Tech's Heritage

Construction and demolition (C&D) debris consists of materials used in buildings and infrastructure projects (e.g., roads and bridges). According to the EPA569 million tons C&D debris were generated in the United States in 2017 (the most current year for which data is available). This is more than twice the amount of waste generated from municipal sources (e.g., trash generated by building occupants).

C&D debris includes materials that could be reused such as steel, wood products, brick and clay tile, and concrete. To divert otherwise reusable C&D material from the landfill, construction of The Kendeda Building had to be net positive waste, meaning more items had to be salvaged than sent to the landfill.

The project team took this Imperative as an opportunity to salvage materials from iconic Georgia Tech buildings and incorporate them into The Kendeda Building. Slate roof tiles from the former Georgia Tech Alumni House became bathroom tiles in The Kendeda Building. Wood from the 2017 renovations of Tech Tower, which was erected in 1888, became stair treads in The Kendeda Building (see image below provided by the Lifecycle Building Challenge). By using salvaged wood from Tech Tower to constructed the common area staircase, the project saved $60,000 as compared to purchasing new materials.​ 

Roof tiles dating to the 1920s were removed from the Alumni House for use in The Kendeda Building as bathroom tiles. Roof tiles dating to the 1920s were removed from the Alumni House for use in The Kendeda Building as bathroom tiles.
Heart pine joists dating back to the 1880s were removed from Tech Tower and have been repurposed as stair treads for The Kendeda Building. Heart pine joists dating back to the 1880s were removed from Tech Tower and have been repurposed as stair treads for The Kendeda Building.

Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Net Positive Water

 

Constructed Wetland

Constructed wetlands are treatment systems that use natural processes involving wetland vegetation, soils, and their associated microbial assemblages to improve water quality. The Kendeda Building’s greywater (used water that does not contain organic matter) is collected from shower drains, sink drains, and water fountains to a primary tank. The greywater is pumped up to a constructed wetland at the main entrance, gravity fed to other filtration and disinfection tanks, and ultimately allowed to infiltrate back into the soil via leach fields at the north end of the site for groundwater recharge. The visible portion of the wetland is at the front door for education and aesthetic purposes.

The Kendeda Building's constructed wetland is a natural method to treat greywater that also provides an amenity for people visiting the building and passersby. The Kendeda Building's constructed wetland is a natural method to treat greywater that also provides an amenity for people visiting the building and passersby.
Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Net Positive Water
 
Rainwater Treatment System

To satisfy the Living Building Challenge, The Kendeda Building collects rainwater for one hundred percent of its drinking, washing, showering, lab uses, and the composting toilet that only use a teaspoon of water per "foam flush." 

An 18,000 square foot catchment area comprised of the building's roof and solar canopy collects rainfall, which is channeled to first-flush filters and then to a 50,000 gallon cistern located in the building's basement. Due to the humid and rainy conditions in the Southeast, the building's roof and solar canopy are expected to harvest 460,000 gallons of water a year. The catchment area harvests approximately 41% of the annual rainfall on the site. 

The design team reviewed three decades of weather data to size the cistern to store enough rainwater to overcome historical droughts and thereby create water resiliency. A rainwater-to-drinking water system treats the water stored in the building's cistern to the prescribed regulatory standard. 

NOTE dated March 25, 2020: The Kendeda Building is undergoing testing to certify its rainwater-to-drinking water purification system. In the meantime, the building is using municipal water. To date, the building has collected and discharged more rainwater than water consumed from the municipal system and is therefore on track for meeting its net positive water requirement.

The cistern is underneath the atrium outside of the auditorium. A special cover informs occupants that they are standing on top of up to 50,000 gallons of rainwater. The cistern is underneath the atrium outside of the auditorium. A special cover informs occupants that they are standing on top of up to 50,000 gallons of rainwater., The building's rainwater-to-drinking water system, which when approved will make The Kendeda Building the smallest municipal water treatment system in Georgia. The building's rainwater-to-drinking water system, which when approved will make The Kendeda Building the smallest municipal water treatment system in Georgia.
Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Net Positive Water
 
Rainwater Treatment System

To satisfy the Living Building Challenge, The Kendeda Building collects rainwater for one hundred percent of its drinking, washing, showering, lab uses, and the composting toilet that only use a teaspoon of water per "foam flush." 

An 18,000 square foot catchment area comprised of the building's roof and solar canopy collects rainfall, which is channeled to first-flush filters and then to a 50,000 gallon cistern located in the building's basement. Due to the humid and rainy conditions in the Southeast, the building's roof and solar canopy are expected to harvest 460,000 gallons of water a year. The catchment area harvests approximately 41% of the annual rainfall on the site.

The design team reviewed three decades of weather data to size the cistern to store enough rainwater to overcome historical droughts and thereby create water resiliency. A rainwater-to-drinking water system treats the water stored in the building's cistern to the prescribed regulatory standard. 

NOTE dated March 25, 2020: The Kendeda Building is undergoing testing to certify its rainwater-to-drinking water purification system. In the meantime, the building is using municipal water. To date, the building has collected and discharged more rainwater than water consumed from the municipal system and is therefore on track for meeting its net positive water requirement.

The cistern is underneath the atrium outside of the auditorium. A special cover informs occupants that they are standing on top of up to 50,000 gallons of rainwater. The cistern is underneath the atrium outside of the auditorium. A special cover informs occupants that they are standing on top of up to 50,000 gallons of rainwater., Two filters that are part of the building's rainwater-to-drinking water system, which when approved will make The Kendeda Building the smallest municipal water treatment system in Georgia. Two filters that are part of the building's rainwater-to-drinking water system, which when approved will make The Kendeda Building the smallest municipal water treatment system in Georgia.
Petal: Place
Imperative 01: Limits to Growth

 
Site Restoration

The Kendeda Building is located on a previously developed site (formerly a parking lot) on the northwest corner of Ferst Drive and State Street on Georgia Tech’s campus. The overall design intent is to restore the site as it existed prior to human development. This goal is accomplished by mimicking the hydrological flow of the area and reintroducing vegetation and biology native to the region, referencing the Piedmont Forest ecosystem. The project site moderately slopes down from south to north, with the building and adjacent porch plaza designed to follow this natural topography by terracing, or stepping down, at appropriate elevations.

Adjacent to The Kendeda Building will be the next phase of Georgia Tech's Eco-Commons. This new passive recreation and high performance landscape also replaces surface parking. While this Eco-Commons phase is separate from The Kendeda Building, it is another example of Georgia Tech's commitment to furthering sustainability across the entire campus. The two projects were designed to be interconnected and create one cohesive whole. 

On September 8, 2017 over 50 members of the Georgia Tech community painted a mural on the future Kendeda Building site as part of the Office of Campus Sustainability’s Planting the Seeds event series celebrating the building’s launch. This event was a nod to the Beauty Petal: it educated student volunteers about the project and beautified the parking lot on which the building would be constructed. On September 8, 2017 over 50 members of the Georgia Tech community painted a mural on the future Kendeda Building site as part of the Office of Campus Sustainability’s Planting the Seeds event series celebrating the building’s launch. This event was a nod to the Beauty Petal: it educated student volunteers about the project and beautified the parking lot on which the building would be constructed.
Situated in the southeast corner of an eight-acre piece of land once covered in asphalt, The Kendeda Building offers an expansive view of Georgia Tech's Eco-Commons expansion, a greenspace complement to—and compliment of—the beauty and ideals of this building. Situated in the southeast corner of an eight-acre piece of land once covered in asphalt, The Kendeda Building offers an expansive view of Georgia Tech's Eco-Commons expansion, a greenspace complement to—and compliment of—the beauty and ideals of this building.
Petal: Beauty
Imperative 20: Inspiration + Education
 
Class Labs Adjust To LBC Requirements

Much like the classrooms, the four class labs are designed to foster active learning by using The Kendeda Building as a teaching tool. This conversation began prior to the building's completion. The class labs that were slated to move into the building had never been required to consider energy and water consumption. To assist with the building becoming net positive energy and water, instructors who moved their class labs into the building changed how they teach their courses to conserve energy and water. These lessons can be applied across campus and beyond to help other class labs reduce their environmental impact. 

Microscopes and other equipment used for a biology class lab. Microscopes and other equipment used for a biology class lab.

Petal: Beauty
Imperative 20: Inspiration + Education

 

Inspiring Change

The intent of the Beauty Petal is to recognize the need for beauty as a precursor to caring enough to preserve, conserve, and serve the greater good. Therefore, the Beauty Petal requires inspiration and education as an Imperative.

The Kendeda Building’s office suite, which houses the building Director, Office of Campus Sustainability (OCS), and Global Change Program, is a hub for inspiration and education that advances sustainability on Georgia Tech's campus, the building industry across the southeast, and society globally.

There are regular tours of The Kendeda Building, an informative website (if it is not informative, please let us know), as well as classes that incorporate aspects of the Living Building Challenge into their coursework. Not only is The Kendeda Building the site of topical lectures and events, members of the design team regularly deliver presentations and sit on panels at conferences across the country.

Georgia Tech strives to be a leader in sustainability and to promote action and awareness through education, research, and operational practice. We envision a Georgia Tech where sustainability is integrated into all levels of the Institute, contributing to its social, environmental, and financial excellence and positioning it as a leader in the field. To do this, sustainability must be a core value in everything we do. The Office of Campus Sustainability builds awareness and works with campus departments to reduce Georgia Tech’s environmental impact, preserve resources, and inspire positive action. The Office of Campus Sustainability institutionalizes sustainable and transformative practices in all campus business functions by empowering the campus community, using the campus as a model, and scaling best practices in partnership.

The Global Change Program seeks to train a new generation of leaders who are equipped to pursue solutions to a host of interconnected challenges such as climate change, environmental pollution, water resources, human health, and the ever-rising demand for affordable, clean energy. Georgia Tech has extensive research expertise in energy policy, climate science, renewable energy, and sustainable business, which brings cutting-edge ideas and approaches to our student’s fingertips. A central component of the Global Change Program's mission is to build new partnerships across key units within Georgia Tech, as well as between the Georgia Tech community and outside partners, both private and public.

Over 2,000 people took tours of The Kendeda Building construction site. Over 2,000 people took tours of The Kendeda Building construction site., The Office of Campus Sustainability has regularly scheduled tours set for once a week conducted by an OCS student assistant or OCS staff member. The Office of Campus Sustainability has regularly scheduled tours set for once a week conducted by an OCS student assistant or OCS staff member.
Dr. Kim Cobb, Director of the Global Change Program leads the Smart Sea Level Sensors project, which is a partnership between Chatham Emergency Management Agency officials, City of Savannah officials, and Georgia Tech scientists and engineers who are working together to install a network of internet-enabled sea level sensors across Chatham County. The real-time data on coastal flooding will be used for emergency planning and response. Dr. Kim Cobb, Director of the Global Change Program leads the Smart Sea Level Sensors project, which is a partnership between Chatham Emergency Management Agency officials, City of Savannah officials, and Georgia Tech scientists and engineers who are working together to install a network of internet-enabled sea level sensors across Chatham County. The real-time data on coastal flooding will be used for emergency planning and response.
Petal: Health & Happiness
Imperative 08: Healthy Interior Environment

 
Fresh Air

The Kendeda Building couples a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) with indoor carbon dioxide sensors located throughout the building (CO2 is a good measure of occupancy because we exhale CO2). This allows for a demand control ventilation strategy. In other words, the building automatically adjusts the amount of outside air brought into the building in response to the number of people in a given space. This approach results in improved air quality and reduced energy consumption.

Outside air enters the DOAS located on the roof. Outside air enters the DOAS located on the roof., Exterior ducts transfer fresh air from the DOAS into the building. Exterior ducts transfer fresh air from the DOAS into the building.
Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Net Positive Water
 
Condensate Harvesting

Condensate from the dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) is collected and used in irrigating the green roof and site. Any excess condensate is diverted to the rainwater management system and returned back to the soil to recharge the groundwater.

Condensate being collected within the DOAS. Condensate being collected within the DOAS., The building systems harvest condensate for beneficial reuse. Note that this image was taken during construction to help visualize the process, i.e., the current system is enclosed. The building systems harvest condensate for beneficial reuse. Note that this image was taken during construction to help visualize the process, i.e., the current system is enclosed.
Petal: Materials
Imperative 13: Living Economy Sourcing

 
Locally-Sourced Materials

The intent of the Living Economy Sourcing Imperative is to support investment in local economies that stimulates local economic growth, strengthens community ties and development, and minimizes environmental impacts associated with transportation of products and people. At least fifty percent of all the content was sourced within 621 miles (1,000 km) of the building. The project’s carpet, steel, nail laminated timber, and rigid insulation are all manufactured or fabricated in Georgia. Sustainably harvested wood was sourced from Alabama and 100% recycled content brick were made in Salsbury, North Carolina. To learn more about the brick, click ​here: 
https://livingbuilding.kendedafund.org/2019/05/20/waste-materials-fire-green-leafs-recipe-for-100-percent-recycled-brick/

 

 

Locally sourced 100% recycled content brick, of which 31 percent is post-consumer.. Locally sourced 100% recycled content brick, of which 31 percent is post-consumer..
Petal: Materials
Imperative 14: Net Positive Waste
 
Materials Management

While the Living Building Challenge requirement to be net positive waste only applies to the construction process, this Imperative does require that The Kendeda Building provide dedicated infrastructure for the collection of recyclables and compostable food scraps. Georgia Teach already had a robust materials management plan for campus and The Kendeda Building is providing us with a platform to take materials management to the next level. 

Reduction of waste starts prior to people entering any building. Therefore, the building's Guidelines webpage provides guidance on how to reduce waste. Catered events cannot use styrofoam or single use plastics and are requested to use reusable dishware, cups, utensils, trays, platters, and other serving ware whenever possible. Any disposable packaging and serving ware (e.g., trays, plates, platters, utensils, and cups) must be BPI-Certified compostable products.

There are three materials management stations indoors and two outdoors on the porch. The indoor materials management stations were designed by Georgia Tech students. All of the stations have bins for landfill, plastic, paper, cans, and compost. Two have drawers for hard-to-recycle products such as plastic film, batteries, and glass. In addition, there is one coffee recycling station that accepts lids, liquids, and single-use coffee cups. 

CompostNow, a nonprofit compost collection service, collects the building's compostable materials. The hard-to-recycle materials are periodically transported to the Center for Hard to Recycle Materials, a local nonprofit. These two nonprofits provide measurement of material diverted. Georgia Tech measures the other categories to understand total waste diversion. Georgia Tech also conducts periodic audits to determine the level of contamination with the goal of continuously improving the materials diversion process.

The coffee recycling station alongside one of the indoor materials management stations. The drawers can be extended to place designated hard-to-recycle products. The coffee recycling station alongside one of the indoor materials management stations. The drawers can be extended to place designated hard-to-recycle products.
A student discarding materials in the appropriate bin. A student discarding materials in the appropriate bin.
Petal: Energy
Imperative: Net Positive Energy

 
Radiant Heating and Cooling

Water-based radiant heating and cooling systems are typically comprised of tubes cast within concrete through which warm or cool water is circulated. The Kendeda Building relies on this system throughout the majority of the building.

The main advantage of this system is that the radiant effect directly heats or cools the occupants (think of the warming effect of the sun on your face), rather than traditional airside systems that indirectly provide comfort by conditioning the space. This heating or cooling energy is also delivered more efficiently via water – a one inch pipe can deliver the same amount of energy as a 12 inch x12 inch duct. It also takes advantage of the thermal mass of concrete, which retains temperature for a longer period once heated or cooled.

The Kendeda Building's radiant flooring system is served by the campus central chilled water loop. When the building needs to provide cooling, the mechanical system draws chilled water directly from the campus loop and distributes it through the pipes in the floor. When the building needs to provide heating, the building’s heat pumps operate to provide heating hot water, while at the same time producing “waste” chilled water. This chilled water is returned to the campus chilled water loop and reduces the cooling load of the campus plant, not unlike how excess electricity produced by the building’s solar array lowers the electrical load on campus.

The building's proportional share of the campus chilled water plant water and electricity use are factored for the annual net positive calculations​.

 

Cross section of a sample radiant flooring system. Cross section of a sample radiant flooring system., The radiant flooring system being installed in The Kendeda Building. The radiant flooring system being installed in The Kendeda Building.
Petal: Energy
Imperative 06: Net Positive Energy
 
Clerestory Windows

Throughout history, clerestory windows have been popular for their ability to unobtrusively deliver natural light to large interior spaces. In The Kendeda Building, operable clerestory windows at the roof of the atrium provide ample daylight and natural ventilation. Considered an effective and simple passive design technique, these windows reduce the need for electrically-powered artificial lighting and air conditioning, which greatly contribute to the building reaching its net positive energy goal.
 

Ceiling Fans

There are 63 ceiling fans throughout the building for air circulation and human comfort. Four are high volume, low velocity fans, two of which are in the atrium and two in the auditorium. The remainder are smaller ceiling fans located in other areas of the building. The smaller ceiling fans each have a motion sensor that allow for automatic shut-off.

Operable clerestory windows and a high volume, low velocity fan in the atrium. Operable clerestory windows and a high volume, low velocity fan in the atrium., A smaller ceiling fan in one of the building's class labs. A smaller ceiling fan in one of the building's class labs.
Petal: Beauty
Imperative: Inspiration + Education
 
Transforming Future Generations Of Thinkers

The Kendeda Building is a multi-disciplinary, non-departmental education building designed to function as a true living, learning laboratory. The building welcomes the broadest cross section of students so that they can be inspired by its regenerative design.  

The Kendeda Building helps educate and transform future generations of thinkers and doers to not only create a more sustainable environment, but one that actually gives back and improves the world. The Kendeda Building features two 64-person classrooms to provide learning opportunities across a variety of subject areas. The classrooms are on the second floor and can be accessed via the atrium. ­­­­

A climate symposium being held in one of the building's classrooms. A climate symposium being held in one of the building's classrooms.
Petal: Beauty
Imperative 20: Inspiration + Education
 
Curated Courses

The Kendeda Building is a multi-disciplinary, non-departmental education building. Rather than focus on one subject such as physics or ecology, the design team envisioned a building that welcomes the broadest cross section of students. The goal is to have as many students circulate through the building as possible so that they can be inspired by its regenerative design.  

The Kendeda Building's 24-person design studio and 16-person seminar room are reserved for courses that are selected by an academic committee. Theses two rooms are not managed by the Registrar's Office and afford a degree of flexibility and creativity in courses offered. Many courses taught in these spaces focus on the principles of the Living Building Challenge. 

 
Professor Michael Gamble teaching a course in the design studio. Professor Michael Gamble teaching a course in the design studio.
Petal: Materials
Imperative 14: Net Positive Waste
 
Fostering a Salvage Economy

Construction and demolition (C&D) debris consists of materials used in buildings and infrastructure projects (e.g., roads and bridges). According to the EPA, 569 million tons C&D debris were generated in the United States in 2017 (the most current year for which data is available). This is more than twice the amount of waste generated from municipal sources (e.g., trash generated by building occupants).

C&D debris includes materials that could be reused such as steel, wood products, brick and clay tile, and concrete. To divert otherwise reusable C&D material from the landfill, construction of The Kendeda Building had to be net positive waste, meaning more items had to be salvaged than sent to the landfill. 

The project reused materials from other buildings and sources on campus. For example, storm-fallen black oak, white oak, and water oak were collected, milled, and dried for “live edge” counters, tables, and benches.

The project team also partnered with the Lifecycle Building Center, an Atlanta-based nonprofit that captures building materials from the waste stream and directs them back into the community through reuse. The Lifecycle Building Center collected C&D debris from the community for use in the building. For example, 25,000 linear feet of 2x4 wood was salvaged from local film sets and incorporated into the nail laminated timber floor/ceiling assembly. 

The reuse of C&D debris is an untapped economic development opportunity. Rather than sending these beneficial materials to the landfill, we can use local labor to "virtually mine" the landfills for these raw materials and divert them to construction projects. We could jumpstart such a "salvage economy" if every new building / renovation followed the Living Building Challenge's lead and incorporated at least one salvaged material per 500 square meters of gross building area.

There is a secondary benefit to diverting this material from landfills: reduction in global carbon pollution. First, reuse of material reduces the amount of energy and water required to create new material. This reduction in energy and water use also reduces the amount of greenhouse gases emitted. Second, decomposing wood in landfills releases methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. Diverting wood from the landfill eliminates this negative impact. 

The Lifecycle Building Center collected discarded 2x4 pieces of wood from local movie sets. The Lifecycle Building Center collected discarded 2x4 pieces of wood from local movie sets., Salvaged 2x4 pieces of wood were incorporated into the building's floor/ceiling assembly. Salvaged 2x4 pieces of wood were incorporated into the building's floor/ceiling assembly., Georgia Tech preserved storm-fallen trees. Georgia Tech preserved storm-fallen trees. , An example of a storm-fallen tree being turned into a “live edge” counter in the building. An example of a storm-fallen tree being turned into a “live edge” counter in the building.
Petal: Materials
Imperative 10: Red List 

 
Healthier Materials

The Red List imperative aims to eliminate the use of 22 worst-in-class materials or chemicals (almost 800 in total) with the greatest impact to human and ecosystem health. To avoid the use of Red List materials, the design-build team thoroughly vetted proposed materials by selecting and specifying products that are documented as being free of Red List materials or chemicals. One way of vetting the materials and products was to search for products that have Cradle to Cradle Certification, Healthy Product Declaration, or Declare Label, which is a “nutrition label” for and online database of compliant building materials that was developed by the International Living Future Institute. 

In addition, the team advocated for change and transparency among industry material suppliers. This advocacy by The Kendeda Building project team, as well as the project teams of existing certified Living Buildings, has shifted the market. For example, The Kendeda Building's fluid-applied air-and-water barrier is made by a company that changed its formulation to be free of Red List materials in order to be selected by the Bullitt Center, which was seeking Living Building Challenge certification. To learn more about the air-and-water barrier, click here https://livingbuilding.kendedafund.org/2019/03/29/prosoco-air-barrier-closely-tied-to-living-buildings

In the adjacent video by Southface Institute, Eckardt Group discusses how they deployed an alternative strategy with flexible conduit that was Red List-compliant and suitable for The Kendeda Building.

Ecktardt Group is recognized as a SWARM Changemaker. Learn how they deployed an alternative strategy with flexible conduit that was red list-compliant and suitable for this state-of-the-art sustainable building on the Georgia Tech campus.
The orange layer seen in this image is a fluid-applied air-and-water barrier made by a company that specifically removed red-list materials from its product in order to comply with the Living Building Challenge. The orange layer seen in this image is a fluid-applied air-and-water barrier made by a company that specifically removed red-list materials from its product in order to comply with the Living Building Challenge., For The Kendeda Building, Eckardt Electric replaced pipes made of PVC, a Red List material, with pipes made of high-density polyethylene. Image courtesy of Eckardt Electric. For The Kendeda Building, Eckardt Electric replaced pipes made of PVC, a Red List material, with pipes made of high-density polyethylene. Image courtesy of Eckardt Electric.
Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Pet Positive Water
 
Rainfall Management

Our civilization's typical built environment is designed to treat natural occurrences as nuisances. For example, impervious surfaces turn rainfall, which can be beneficial, into stormwater that burdens infrastructure and often negatively impacts downstream communities.

In contrast, The Kendeda Building site treats rainfall as an asset. The building's roof and solar canopy capture approximately 41% of rain that falls on the site each year. This rainwater is stored in a cistern, treated, and then used for drinking, washing, showering, lab uses, and the composting toilet that only use a teaspoon of water per "foam flush." 

The outdoor areas have systems designed specifically to assist in the management of rainwater. Following the natural moderate slope from south to north, the porch terraces, or steps down, at appropriate elevations. This geometry accommodates cascading porch areas that support substantial water storage underneath the permeable pavers. Unlike a traditional stormwater management approach that concentrates water storage in a single area, this method of managing rainwater relies on dispersed locations along the sloped site in order to leverage gravity to assist in controlling the flow of water.

NOTE dated March 25, 2020: The Kendeda Building is undergoing testing to certify its rainwater-to-drinking water purification system. In the meantime, the building is using municipal water. To date, the building has collected and discharged more rainwater than water consumed from the municipal system and is therefore on track for meeting its net positive water requirement.

The building is surrounded with pervious surfaces and bioswales that allow for water to slowly seep into the ground. The building is surrounded with pervious surfaces and bioswales that allow for water to slowly seep into the ground., During heavy rainfall events, bioswales fill with water that slowly infiltrates into the ground for groundwater recharge. During heavy rainfall events, bioswales fill with water that slowly infiltrates into the ground for groundwater recharge.

Petal: Water
Imperative 05: Net Positive Water

 

Harvesting Rainwater

Metro Atlanta has limited available groundwater and relies on rivers, streams, and reservoirs for its municipal water supply. The region is relatively close to the headwaters of these rivers and streams, which limits the ability to withdraw water sustainability. Recognizing this constraint, 100% of occupant water comes from captured precipitation. The solar canopy and rooftop harvest approximately 41% of site's annual rainfall and funnel it to a 50,000 gallon cistern in the basement.

The solar canopy is also a key design feature that gets The Kendeda Building to net positive energy.

NOTE dated March 25, 2020: The Kendeda Building is undergoing testing to certify its rainwater-to-drinking water purification system. In the meantime, the building is using municipal water. To date, the building has collected and discharged more rainwater than water consumed from the municipal system and is therefore on track for meeting its net positive water requirement.

Portions of the solar canopy that overhang the roof have gutters that channel rainwater to the roof, where the water is drained into the cistern. Portions of the solar canopy that overhang the roof have gutters that channel rainwater to the roof, where the water is drained into the cistern.
Petal: Health + Happiness
Imperative 09: Biophilic Environment
 
Connection to Nature

The Health + Happiness Petal focuses on the most important environmental conditions that must be present to create robust, healthy spaces, rather than to address all of the potential ways that an interior environment could be compromised. For example, this Imperative requires occupant access to fresh air and daylight. Therefore, The Kendeda Building has been designed to include elements that provide occupants with visual and physical connections to nature.

The building's porch will have a direct connection to the next phase of Georgia Tech's Eco-Commons, a greenspace complement to - and compliment of - the ideals of the building. 

The building allows for ample natural lighting and provides views to the outdoors, as well as operable windows for fresh air. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer. The building allows for ample natural lighting and provides views to the outdoors, as well as operable windows for fresh air. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer.
Petal: Energy
Imperative 06: Net Positive Energy

 
Energy Recovery System

The Kendeda Building couples a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) with indoor carbon dioxide sensors that determine the amount of outside air that needs to be brought into the building. The system only brings in the amount of outside air that is required by occupants (CO2 being a good measure of occupancy because we exhale CO2). Indoor air is then exhausted in order to maintain a slightly positive pressure in the building. 

In the summer, cooler dehumidified indoor air leaves the building and hotter humid air enters. An enthalpy wheel, also known as a thermal wheel, in the DOAS transfers energy and humidity from the incoming hot, humid air stream to the outgoing cooler, drier air stream. This process cools and dehumidifies the outdoor hot, humid air entering the building and thereby reduces the load on the building’s other mechanical systems.

In the winter, the same concept works in reverse. The cold air entering the building is heated by warmer air being exhausted by the building.

Outside air enters the DOAS through a unit that contains the thermal wheel. Outside air enters the DOAS through a unit that contains the thermal wheel., Exterior ducts transfer the fresh air from the DOAS into the building. Exterior ducts transfer the fresh air from the DOAS into the building.
Petal: Energy
Imperative 06: Net Positive Energy

 
72% More Efficient

The Energy Petal requires net positive energy, which means at least 105% of the project’s energy needs must be supplied by on-site renewable energy on a net annual basis, without the use of on-site combustion. To reduce the size of the solar array that would be needed to reach this net positive energy goal, The Kendeda Building designers focused on passive design techniques that leverage the natural climate, solar, and energy characteristics of a building and its surroundings to lower energy demands. 

For The Kendeda Building, special attention was given to designing an efficient building envelope. The performance of the building envelope is critical both to the energy efficiency of the building and to the comfort level of the occupants. This includes continuous insulation at walls and under slabs and triple pane window glazing. The triple pane window's outer surface and the middle pane’s room-side surface are treated with a low-emissivity metallic coating. This reduces solar heat gain during hot weather, while the room-side coating helps with insulation during cold weather. As a result, the building has a reduced electricity load during the winter and summer seasons.

Through energy efficiency alone, the building's projected energy use intensity (EUI) is 30 kBTU/SF/YR, which is 72 percent more efficient than an average building of the same size and occupancy. The photovoltaic array is designed to generate 42 EUI which will offset the building’s 30 EUI. 

 

Installation of triple pane windows. Both half-inch spaces between the three quarter-inch panes are filled with argon gas, which has greater insulating qualities than air. Installation of triple pane windows. Both half-inch spaces between the three quarter-inch panes are filled with argon gas, which has greater insulating qualities than air.
Petal: Health + Happiness
Imperative: None; the team implemented its own Health + Happiness ethos 
 
Bird-Safe Glass

Building collisions are one of the top human-related killers of birds. Up to 988 million birds die in the United States annually after flying into windows. Buildings like The Kendeda Building are responsible for a majority of these deaths. It has 9,500 square feet of windows and is surrounded by a habitat that is naturally inviting to birds.

While the Living Building Challenge does not require bird-friendly design, the project team felt that the building had to address the bird-collision problem because the Health + Happiness of wildlife should also be considered. In collaboration with the American Bird Conservancy and the Atlanta Audubon Society, the team selected a window that has visible patterns that signal to birds that they should avoid the windows.

Learn more about The Kendeda Building's bird-safe glass here: https://livingbuilding.kendedafund.org/2019/04/26/kendeda-buildings-bird-safe-glass-shockingly-huge-issue

Bird-safe glass on the west side of the building. Bird-safe glass on the west side of the building.
Petal: Beauty
Imperative 19: Beauty + Spirit 

 
Inspired By Southern Architecture

No southern dwelling would be complete without its porch, and The Kendeda Building is no exception. Shaded by the solar canopy above, the porch of the building bridges the physical building to the surrounding landscape – eventually connecting and integrating with next phase of Georgia Tech's Eco-Commons, a greenspace complement to - and compliment of - the ideals of the building. The porch also serves as a point of entry to the building, accessible by all through several entry points.

The outdoor porch area houses several functional systems designed specifically to assist in the management of rainfall. Following the natural moderate slope from north to south, the porch terraces, or steps down, at appropriate elevations. This geometry accommodates cascading porch areas that support substantial volume storage underneath the permeable pavers. Unlike a traditional stormwater management approach that concentrates water storage in a single area, this method of managing rainwater relies upon dispersed locations along the sloped site in order to leverage gravity to assist in controlling the flow of water.

The Kendeda Building's solar canopy creates a front porch for the building. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer. The Kendeda Building's solar canopy creates a front porch for the building. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer.
The front porch is a gathering place for students, staff, and visitors. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer. The front porch is a gathering place for students, staff, and visitors. Photo Credit: Jonathan Hillyer.
Petal: Place
Imperative 04: Human Powered Living
 
Pedestrian Oriented Mobility

The Kendeda Building focuses on pedestrian oriented mobility. The staircases are inviting and there is a centrally located ramp. The elevator is tucked away, out of site. This encourages physical activity by occupants. 

Several campus bus routes stop at The Kendeda Building. The Georgia Tech Shuttle connects the building to public transportation. In this regard, The Kendeda Building is only one connection from Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, the busiest airport in the world! 

There is zero parking provided on site. Protected bike parking is provided for full-time occupants, students, and visitors, Based on usage, biking is an extremely popular option. The porch is designed to provide shelter and cover from rain and sun while walking through the site.

Fully utilized bike racks in front of the building. Fully utilized bike racks in front of the building., There is a bus stop directly in front of The Kendeda Building. There is a bus stop directly in front of The Kendeda Building.
Petal: Energy
Imperative 06: Net Positive Energy
 
Photovoltaic (PV) Canopy

To achieve Living Building Challenge certification, The Kendeda Building must function at net positive energy – meaning it must harness more energy (in this case via PV solar panels) than it consumes. One hundred and five percent of the building’s energy needs must be supplied by on-site renewable energy on a net annual basis, without the use of on-site combustion.

As with other natural resources, The Kendeda Building must balance the energy it uses with the energy it is able to produce. During the design process, consideration was first given to passive design such as using daylight to reduce energy demands and then to energy conservation measures such as efficient mechanical systems. Passive design and energy efficiency reduce the size of the PV array that makes the building net positive energy.

The 330 kW (DC) solar array is expected to generate over 455,000 kWh of electricity per year that will directly serve the building’s energy demands including lighting, heating and cooling, water systems, and plug loads. In addition to those loads, the PV system is designed to satisfy the five percent net positive factor that is required for Living Building Challenge certification as well as a safety factor that provides a buffer against unknowns. A lithium ion battery serves as the emergency back-up system for the building in the case of power outages. 

The Kendeda Building's radiant flooring system borrows water from the campus central chilled water loop. Water from the campus connection is metered, the building's proportional share of energy consumption is calculated, and an energy offset is supplied by the building's PV array to the grid in order to meet the annual net positive energy requirement.

When the PV array is not producing adequate amounts of electricity, the building loads run off of electricity from the grid. All electricity generated beyond what the building uses goes instantaneously to adjacent buildings for their use thereby reducing the amount of electricity needed from the utility provider. 

The PV canopy is also a key design feature that gets The Kendeda Building to net positive water

Video created by Skanska of The Kendeda Building's PV canopy.
The Kendeda Building's 330 kW (DC) solar canopy is comprised of 913 PV panels. The PV canopy is also a primary rain water collection surface. Photo Credit: Vertical River. The Kendeda Building's 330 kW (DC) solar canopy is comprised of 913 PV panels. The PV canopy is also a primary rain water collection surface. Photo Credit: Vertical River., In addition to generating electricity, the solar canopy reduces energy consumption by providing shade for the building. Photo Credit: Miller Hull Partnership. In addition to generating electricity, the solar canopy reduces energy consumption by providing shade for the building. Photo Credit: Miller Hull Partnership.
Petal: Materials
Imperative 11: Embodied Carbon Footprint

 
Minimizing Carbon Impact

The Living Building Challenge requires all projects to account for the total embodied carbon impact from the construction process through a one-time carbon offset. However, the goal is to reduce this initial embodied carbon pollution; thereby, lowering the size of the one-time offset.

Climate change has become a political topic and therefore conversations about the reduction of carbon pollution can be difficult. By design, The Kendeda Building provides a pathway to have carbon discussions that focus on common goals. For example, The Kendeda Building extensively uses mass timber products because wood has substantially lower embodied carbon pollution compared to steel or concrete. This fact highlights the economic development opportunities that can result from constructing commercial buildings from local wood products

According to the Georgia Forestry Association, Georgia has 22 million acres of commercially available, private timberland, more than any other state. While the requirements of the Living Building Challenge necessitated the building to use some mass timber products imported from other states in the Southeast, the project highlights the importance of expanding Georgia's ability to provide timber products for commercial buildings. 

The Kendeda Building's extensive use of mass timber displaces the need for concrete and steel. Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. Cement, a key ingredient of concrete, accounts for approximately 8% of total global CO2 emissions. To decrease this impact, The Kendeda Building incorporated technology that reduces the embodied carbon pollution of cement. Thomas Concrete, a local firm, provided this innovative process. To learn more, click here: https://livingbuilding.kendedafund.org/2019/07/16/carboncure.

The building Kendeda Building also reduces carbon pollution by incorporating salvaged building materials.

Thomas Concrete received The Swarm Changemakers Award for the innovative concrete used in The Kendeda Building, which among other things captures carbon.
The Kendeda Building used mass timber as the primary structural element because of its low embodied carbon pollution and its beauty. The Kendeda Building used mass timber as the primary structural element because of its low embodied carbon pollution and its beauty., Use of salvaged timber, coupled with reduced-carbon concrete lowered the size of The Kendeda Building's one-time offset. Use of salvaged timber, coupled with reduced-carbon concrete lowered the size of The Kendeda Building's one-time offset.
Petal: Water
Imperative: Net Positive Water
 
Composting Toilets

The Net Positive Water Imperative requires, among other things, that all toilet waste must be treated on-site and managed either through reuse, a closed loop system, or infiltration. For toilet waste, the design team analyzed two options: a compost toilet system and a blackwater system.

The blackwater option required more water, which would necessitate are larger cistern and a larger rainfall catchment area. This would both increase costs and conflict with square foot limitations of the building. In addition, the blackwater option had increased regulatory burdens and operational costs. Therefore, the design team selected the compost toilet scenario.

Composting toilets use about a teaspoon of water to activate a biodegradable foam to coat the sides of toilets. The waste is transported to one of six bins that are housed in the building's basement. The bins contain wood shavings that receive the waste and help natural processes decompose the waste. Because most biowaste is actually liquid, the liquids slowly seep to the bottom of the bins where a sump pump transfers the liquid, called leachate or compost tea, to one of two 1,000-gallon storage tanks. About once a month, 2,000 gallons of compost tea is transported to a local wastewater treatment facility where it is stripped of its nutrients for beneficial reuse

These foam flush toilets have become one of the most talked about features of the building, which is why we say that there is a lot of "potty talk" in The Kendeda Building! While the excitement is all in good fun, it is also a serious matter. Atlanta has an overburdened sewer system and as a result, it has some of the highest water and sewer rates in the country. Because the building's compost toilet system does not connect to the sewer, it does not burden an already stressed system. Moreover, the composting toilet system eliminates the carbon pollution embedded into the electricity required to treat and convey water and wastewater.   

 

The foam in action. The foam in action., The building's six collection bins and two leachate tanks. The building's six collection bins and two leachate tanks., The composting toilets generate a lot of excitement on tours. The composting toilets generate a lot of excitement on tours. , Most tours end in the compost bin room where we have important conversations about how we should manage our waste. Most tours end in the compost bin room where we have important conversations about how we should manage our waste.
Petals: Equity and Water
Imperative: explicit – Net Positive Water; however rainfall management is an Equity consideration
 
Reducing Burden To Downstream Communities

People may not immediately think of rainfall management as an equity issue. However, our typical built environment treats rainfall, which can be beneficial, as stormwater that requires extensive infrastructure to manage.

The vast majority of buildings do not manage rainfall onsite. They divert rainwater into sewers, the streets, or just "away" from the site. Impervious surfaces such as concrete and asphalt prohibits soil from absorbing water. Therefore, "away" becomes a "not in my backyard" approach that impacts something, someone, somewhere downstream.

The rush of rainfall that has been turned into stormwater can be devastating even during normal rain events. Roads can be temporarily impassable due to localized flooding. The ground’s inability to absorb rainfall often floods downstream areas. To learn more about this impact in communities to the west of Georgia Tech, visit the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance website: http://wawa-online.org.  

The design team understood that the site’s position in the landscape came with responsibility. In other words, the fact that the site is upstream from other areas in the Peachtree Creek watershed requires Equity considerations. The design team’s decisions would impact downstream areas that are not on the site.

By following the requirements of the Living Building Challenge, The Kendeda Building dramatically mitigates these negative downstream impacts. The site mimics the hydrological flow of the area and reintroduced vegetation and biology native to the region, referencing the Piedmont Forest ecosystem. This ecosystem retains 90% of the rainfall during a normal storm event. The Kendeda Building site does the same, thereby functioning as a forest instead of a building.

Every aspect of the building is designed to slow the flow of rainfall. The solar canopy and rooftop harvest approximately 41% of site's annual rainfall and funnel it to a 50,000 gallon cistern in the basement. The building is surrounded with pervious surfaces and bioswales that allow for water to slowly seep into the ground.

If more buildings and communities followed The Kendeda Building’s lead, more rainfall would be managed on-site rather than becoming someone else’s problem. And, as The Kendeda Building has shown, managing rainfall on-site can turn stormwater, which burdens infrastructure and can negatively impact downstream communities, into an asset such as drinking water, irrigation water, or even an amenity such as public greenspace

A flooded portion of Atlanta's North Avenue during a thunderstorm. A flooded portion of Atlanta's North Avenue during a thunderstorm., This imagine showcases two different approaches to the built environment. The street is made of impervious asphalt that turns rainfall into stormwater, which has to be channeled to sewer drains. In contrast, The Kendeda Building manages 90% of an average rainfall on-site. This imagine showcases two different approaches to the built environment. The street is made of impervious asphalt that turns rainfall into stormwater, which has to be channeled to sewer drains. In contrast, The Kendeda Building manages 90% of an average rainfall on-site.

It takes a village to raise a Living Building! The Kendeda Building is cared for by a dedicated, multi-departmental team who seek to maximize occupant wellness and building performance.

Below is the name, title, and an interesting fact for each team member pictured above (list from left to right):

  • Marlon Ellis, Area Six Maintenance Manager, officiates college basketball games in his spare time.
  • Steve Place, Horticulturist II, is fluent in French.
  • Dexter Harper, A/C Mechanic II, has been skydiving.
  • Marilyn Lofton, Custodian II, has stood at the edge of the Grand Canyon.
  • Ronald Wormley, Custodian III, is a skilled mixologist.
  • Kamilah Roberts, Program Support Coordinator, writes poetry and plays the saxophone.
  • Johnny Rand, Campus Recycling Specialist II, is a United States Navy veteran with 20 years of service as an Aircraft Mechanic Air Warfare Specialist.
  • Alexander Gurciullo, IT Project Management Support Specialist II, has an MA in Modern Russian History. 
  • Shan Arora, Director of The Kendeda Building, has been to the second northernmost Taco Bell in the world.

The Georgia Institute of Technology dedicated a new building Oct. 24 that rewrites the rules for sustainability in the Southeast.

In fact, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design isn’t really sustainable at all; more accurately, the newest building on the Atlanta campus is regenerative. And it has reimagined from the ground up what a campus building can be.

To celebrate all who worked tirelessly on The Kendeda Building, Georgia Tech hosted Friends and Family Day and welcomed more than 200 people through the building.

Information Coming Soon

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is located at:
422 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta GA  30313Online map.

Walking:
The Kendeda Building is located on the northwest corner of Ferst Drive and State Street. The building’s main entrance is located off of Ferst Drive.

Biking:
The Kendeda Building has multiple bike racks for cyclists and changing/showering facilities. Bike racks are located next to the entrance off of Ferst Drive.

Transit:
The closest MARTA station is Midtown MARTA (1.1 miles from The Kendeda Building). Click for walking directions from the Midtown MARTA station to The Kendeda Building. The Tech Trolley takes visitors (you do not need a Georgia Tech ID to ride) from Midtown MARTA to campus. The closest stop to the building is at the intersection of Ferst Drive and Atlantic Drive, which is one block east of The Kendeda Building.

Parking:
Parking is available for a fee ($2/hour) at the Visitors Area 5: North Campus Parking Deck on State Street. Walk to The Kendeda Building by exiting the North Campus Parking Deck and then walking towards State Street. Make a left on State Street and walk towards Ferst Drive. The building is on your right at the intersection of the two streets. The main entrance is off of Ferst Drive. The Kendeda Building does not provide parking reimbursements for visitors.

The Kendeda Building is closed to the public until further notice.

Georgia Tech operates The Kendeda Building in accordance with the Living Building Challenge (LBC), the world’s most rigorous sustainable design and performance standard for buildings. To meet LBC requirements, The Kendeda Building abides by sustainable operating procedures. For example, The Kendeda Building must produce more onsite renewable electricity than it uses, as well as collect, treat, and reuse more water than it needs. This webpage provides guidance on how events can be part of The Kendeda Building’s success.

Please note that the Kendeda Building is primarily a classroom and class lab. Therefore, rooms cannot be booked past this semester, which ends on Tuesday November 24, 2020. Furthermore, unlike any other building on campus, The Kendeda Building must abide by strict requirements including remaining net positive energy and net positive water over the course of the year. The building's priority is ensuring that the energy and water needs of all scheduled classes and class labs are met. Any surplus can then be spread across extracurricular activities.

Table of Contents

 

I. Catering

This section contains policies that are applicable across all campus buildings, as well as guidelines and policies that are specific to The Kendeda Building.

Campus-wide Catering and Alcohol Policies

All events in The Kendeda Building must follow Georgia Tech’s general catering and alcohol policies:

Kendeda Building Catering Guidelines and Policy
  • Food - To the greatest extent possible, food served in The Kendeda Building should follow Principles of Healthy, Sustainable Menus established by the Menus of Change Initiative of the Culinary Institute of America and the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Highlights include:
    • Plant proteins such as nuts and legumes as the primary protein source.
    • Animal-based ingredients in a reduced role, with a special emphasis on decreased purchasing of red meat.
    • Plant based oils.
    • Whole, minimally processed foods.
    • Organic, seasonal, and/or locally produced (grown within 500 miles of campus) foods.
  • Energy - In accordance with LBC requirements, caterers may not utilize an open flame for heat (e.g. no sterno chaffing dishes). So that the building’s electricity consumption can be managed and tracked for LBC certification, caterers must coordinate with The Kendeda Building Program Support Coordinator (Kamilah Roberts, kamilah.roberts@sustain.gatech.edu) if electricity will be used to heat food onsite. Caterers must coordinate with The Kendeda Building Program Support Coordinator for use of refrigerator in the building’s catering space.
  • Waste Diversion - Caterers are expected to place recoverable materials (e.g., aluminum cans, mixed paper, rigid plastic bottles and containers, compostable service ware, and food scraps) in the appropriate resource recovery bin. All other items should be placed in the landfill bin. Below are additional details regarding waste diversion for The Kendeda Building: 
    • The Kendeda Building does not allow Styrofoam.
    • Use reusable dishware, cups, utensils, trays, platters, and other serving ware whenever possible.
    • Any disposable packaging and serving ware (e.g., trays, plates, platters, utensils, and cups) must be BPI-Certified compostable products.
    • Do not use single use plastics.
    • Select buffet or party platter options instead of box lunches.
    • Serve bite-sized foods that do not require utensils whenever possible.
 

II. Promotional Materials, Decor, and Logistics

The main goal for events held in The Kendeda Building is to eliminate items sent to the landfill. 

Promotional Materials
  • Go paperless. Send event communications (e.g., invitations and reminders) via electronic means (e.g., email, social media, and websites). Email agendas and presentations beforehand rather than printing.
  • If printing handouts is required, use recycled-content paper, one-inch margins, and print double-sided. Instruct guests on how and where to recycle or compost materials.
  • Plan for reuse. Create timeless banners, signs, and other displays. Laminate and omit information that changes frequently, such as the date.
  • Minimize giveaways or provide environmentally friendly ones. This could include carbon offsets for travel, materials made with recycled content, or reusable bags, mugs, or bottles. See the Office of Campus Sustainability’s Sustainable Giveaway Guide for ideas.
Decor
  • Decor should be reusable and non-perishable.
  • For flowers, choose options that are local, organic, or certified sustainably and/or ethically grown.
Logistics
  • Announce sustainable event features to attendees during the event. Include an explanation of what materials can and should be recycled or composted.
  • Notify guests, via electronic communications, of public transportation options, walking routes, and bike rack locations before the event. Encourage low-carbon footprint methods of transportation by offering incentives or prizes to those who take public transportation, carpool, or walk.
  • Opt out of nametags or collect and reuse plastic nametags.
 

III. Reservations and Room Specifications

Please note that the Kendeda Building is primarily a classroom and class labTherefore, rooms cannot be booked past this semester, which ends on Tuesday November 24, 2020. Unlike any other building on campus, The Kendeda Building must abide by strict requirements including remaining net positive energy and net positive water over the course of the year. The building's priority is ensuring that the energy and water needs of all scheduled classes and class labs are met. Any surplus can then be spread across extracurricular activities. Therefore, when making a reservation, please note the following will generally not be approved:

  • Reservations made during the same week of the event (e.g., request submitted on Monday for an event on Thursday of the same week). 
  • Every date of a recurring reservation (such requests will be limited to a few meeting in the building in order to distribute the energy and water budget across a greater cross-section of students, faculty, and staff). 
  • Reservations that have a low number of people in a room designed for greater occupancy. 
Requesting Space

For those internal to Georgia Tech (students, staff, faculty), "request classroom space" using the Georgia Tech Events Management System (EMS) at http://www.space.gatech.edu/gt-events. Because the building must adhere to energy and water usage requirements, all requests via EMS must be approved. Please allow for five business days for notification of whether your reservation has been approved.  

For groups not internal to Georgia Tech, please note that the building is primarily a classroom. We will consider external requests for reservations on a case-by-case basis. Contact Kamilah Roberts (kamilah.roberts@sustain.gatech.edu)​ to discuss space availability and fees.

Room Layout and Technology

The default layout for all rooms is classroom layout. Alternative room layouts have to be approved by Kamilah Roberts or Shan Arora. While tables and chairs are moveable within each room, the person reserving a room is responsible for any change in layout and then ensuring that the room is returned to classroom layout. 

110 Design Studio

  • Room dimension: 31' - 10 5/8" L x 29' - 10 1/8" D
  • Seats 24 people.
  • Bring your own device.
  • Flat screen monitor.
  • No computer, document camera, microphones, teleconference, speakers, or webcam.

​118 Seminar Room

  • Room dimension: 22' - 11 3/4" L x 17' - 5 1/4" D
  • Seats 16 people.
  • Bring your own device.
  • Flat screen monitor, teleconference, and webcam (users have to have their own web-conferencing bridge/system).
  • No computer, document camera, or microphones.

152 Auditorium

  • Room dimension: 71' - 3 5/8" L x 52' - 9 1/4" D
  • Seats 176 people.
  • Bring your own device or use installed computer.
  • Installed computer, two projectors, two screens, document camera, speakers, and webcam (users have to have their own web-conferencing bridge/system).
  • Four floating microphones.

210 Classroom 

  • Room dimension: 51' - 9 1/4" L x 31' - 5 3/8" D
  • Seats 64 people.
  • Bring your own device.
  • Two projectors, two screens, speakers, and webcam (users have to have their own web-conferencing bridge/system).
  • One podium microphone and one lapel microphone.
  • No document camera.​

230 Classroom

  • Room dimension: 50' - 10 1/4" L x 31' - 5 3/8" D
  • Seats 64 people.
  • Bring your own device.
  • Two projectors, two screens, speakers, and webcam (users have to have their own web-conferencing bridge/system).
  • One podium microphone and one lapel microphone.
  • No document camera.​
Audio/Visual

If you want to show a presentation, bring your own laptop. Only the Auditorium has a built-in computer, accessible if you have a Georgia Tech profile. All other rooms are "bring your own device." You can connect to the room projector wirelessly or via an HDMI connection (note that the Makerspace / Design Studio does not have wireless connection). If your computer does not have an HDMI port, please bring an HDMI adapter.  Also, bring your own presentation clicker / advancer / laser pointer. 

The Auditorium has a document camera that can project a document. No other room has a document camera.

The following rooms have a web camera (users have to have their own web-conferencing bridge/system):

  • Seminar Room 118
  • Auditorium 152
  • Classroom 210
  • Classroom 230

The Auditorium has a 5-channel audio system. One microphone attached to the podium and four handheld or lapel microphones. Each of the two classrooms have a 2-channel audio system. One microphone attached to the podium and one lapel microphone. All other rooms do not have audio systems. 

If you have issues with the building's A/V system, please call the A/V Services Team at 404-894-4669. Assistance is available Monday - Friday from 7am to 8pm.

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What is something we only truly notice if we are uncomfortable?—our surrounding’s temperature! When we are comfortable the temperature rarely receives a second thought, but when we are cold or hot, we notice the discomfort immediately. Temperature regulation for The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design (The Kendeda Building) comes with unique challenges. The energy needs for the Living Building Challenge require that the energy produced by the building exceeds the energy used by the building on an annual basis. The heating and cooling systems (HVAC) for a building can account for over 50% of the total energy consumed. The Kendeda HVAC load does account for over 50% of the buildings total energy.  Additionally, Atlanta is located in a sub-tropical region which brings higher temperatures and higher humidity and, of course, the corresponding higher building temperatures.

Human Thermal Comfort

The American Society of Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) developed ASHRAE 55, which defines 6 variables that constitute human thermal comfort:

  • Air temperature: The “dry bulb” temperature that can be measured by a thermometer
  • Radiant temperature: A weighted average of surface temperatures in the room
  • Relative humidity: The percentage of water vapor in the air around the occupant
  • Air velocity: The rate of air movement in the room
  • Metabolic rate: The Energy generated by the occupant (based on the person’s level of exertion)
  • Clothing: The Insulation the occupant is wearing

It is important to remember that thermal comfort is subjective—it is not the same for everyone. ASHRAE 55 states that comfort is achieved if 80% of people are satisfied. Knowing this, the building design team aims to hit a point where the majority of people are comfortable. The Kendeda Building considers the full range of comfort values in a way that most buildings do not. Comfort will not be sacrificed in the building, and it will be met in consideration of all the variables.

Setting a Baseline and Running the Experiment

During The Kendeda Building design process, the building engineers set a baseline temperature and relative humidity point for the building. The parameters that were considered were as high as 80F and 60% relative humidity (rh), which are higher than other set points in buildings typically observed across campus. This situation presented the opportunity for Georgia Tech to understand and quantify varying factors and conditions that make up human thermal comfort in order to best define acceptable design parameters for the Kendeda Building.

Greg Spiro, senior mechanical engineer in Facilities Management, planned an experiment to take advantage of an environmental chamber used on campus in Dr. Mindy Mallard-Stafford’s Exercise Physiology Laboratory. Dr. Millard-Stafford graciously allowed the experiment to operate out of a sealed chamber in her lab. Gathering a group of students and staff, Greg organized a test pilot that rated occupant comfort with different temperatures, relative humidity, and air speed conditions in the on-campus environmental chamber.

Three different baselines were tested:  73F/50%rh (typical standard on campus), 78F/55%/100fpm, 80F/60%rh/100fpm and 80F/60%rh/150fpm. A participant’s gender, age, and clothing were also noted. Participants went into the chamber that was set with those different points, and rated their comfort level immediately afterwards. The most significant result of the data set was that people were generally cooler but more comfortable at the baseline condition, while warmer and less comfortable at other conditions tested. The team decided to not exceed 78F and 50% rh.

A New Baseline

This study shed light on several factors that are key to human thermal comfort. A unique feature of The Kendeda Building that was not able to be recreated in the lab was the effect of radiant surface temperatures.  However, helpful and relative information was still collected. It is recognized that The Kendeda Building may feel different than other traditional spaces on campus while still maintaining high comfort levels. Gathering people together in the room raised the awareness about thermal comfort, and brought the conversation to the forefront. The opportunity remains for research regarding the use of radiant surfaces in the building design vs. that of air movement. It is a compelling discussion that will influence design in our hot and humid climate.

The intent is that The Kendeda Building will be as comfortable as any other building on campus. In light of its stringent Living Building Challenge energy requirements, the thermal comfort point will be maintained by considering more than just temperature and relative humidity. This study demonstrated the interplay of additional variables. Georgia Tech continues to rise to the challenge of meeting the unique situations posed by the construction and operation of a Living Building Challenge certified building. Pilot projects such as these provide the opportunity to test elements before the building opens, and ensure the building is run to the best of its ability.

Additional Information

Every element of The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is being subject to careful scrutiny—water, waste, landscaping, and more. One area of great attention is the energy use of the building, from the heating and cooling systems of the building to the amount of energy building occupant’s laptops use. Electronic use is monitored through plug load monitoring. This Operations & Maintenance pilot project was tasked to understand plug load usage, monitor it over time, and help determine a plan for effectively managing it for The Kendeda Building.

Creating the Project

This pilot project sought to identify and measure plug loads of specific room types that will be similar to those in The Kendeda Building. Another intention of this project was to work to understand behaviors in the use of those spaces. The project is important because it helps to inform design and can be used at The Kendeda Building to inform the operators and managers about energy loads in spaces. Led by Garry Lockerman, Area Maintenance Manager, and Lance Johnson, Utilities Engineer of Facilities Management, the team set up plug load monitoring in office suites that mirrored suites that will be in The Kendeda Building. These spaces were some Clough Commons classrooms, office suites, student common area (CULC), a Biomedical Engineering Building computer lab and maker space (BME), and the Technology Square Research Building (TSRB) GVU prototype lab.

Tool Selection

Garry and Lance shared that the tool they selected to monitor the plug loads can be used remotely. Even outside the duration of the project, information continues to be collected to help influence design decisions. Additionally, the data is collected on a cloud which in turn makes it accessible to numerous users across campus. These features are helpful as they provide a broader time-span of time for data collection and the opportunity for more analysts to review the data.

Lessons Learned

Of the combined energy consumed, the TSRB GVU prototype lab used the most energy, 36%, followed by BME, 34%, with CULC using 30%. The computer lab in BME had a fairly constant plug load with little variation twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week. This indicates that the equipment may not be operating in low power or 'sleep' mode when not in use. The A/V equipment used the most energy in CULC, with the flat screen using power twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week, followed by the open office area that also had power consumption twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week. The realization that electronics were still pulling a large amount of energy even if “sleep” or “off” mode was surprising. This greater awareness equips the Georgia Tech team to both lower individual users energy use and to meet the reduced energy use requirements of The Kendeda Building.

On-site renewable energy will be generated through the 913 panel PV (photovoltaic) array. In assessing the project energy needs during design, the team realized a large roof area would be required to meet energy demands. The large PV array was incorporated as a key design feature of the building.

The Living Building Challenge certification period begins once the building is fully operational and occupied.

In addition to meeting the design and construction requirements of a Living Building Challenge certified project, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design must be a fully functional building with all the technology services building users need to perform their daily work and business. One necessary function is audio and visual (AV) services. The rigorous performance requirements presented by the Living Building Challenge create opportunities for Georgia Tech to rethink its approach on AV equipment standards across campus and leverage technology that will minimize the power consumption of typical AV solutions.

Finding an AV Solution

A joint collaboration was led between AV consultants, Newcomb and Boyd, and the Georgia Tech’s Office of Information Technology’s AV Services team. In order to meet the net-positive energy requirements of the building, the team had to literally reduce the amount of equipment necessary to provide core AV functions to the building – less equipment usually means less energy consumption. The solution they developed leverages the networking equipment in the building to provide the AV switching transport capabilities (in lieu of traditional AV switchers) and Power-over-Ethernet (POE) to power a majority of the AV equipment in the building.

The Kendeda Building will use the AMX Harman SVSi product to transmit AV within the rooms and throughout the building. This is a highly scalable and flexible solution that uses encoders and decoders on the Georgia Tech network to transmit AV from any source to any destination. This approach eliminates the limitations that are usually inherent to traditional AV switchers – namely the number of inputs and outputs of the AV switcher. Once inputs/outputs are maxed out, the switcher needs to be replaced if additional sources or display devices are needed.  With the SVSi solution, all that is needed is an available port on the network switch.

Utilizing the AV Solution

This network solution will meet the AV needs of The Kendeda Building users and align with the building’s energy use requirements. Additionally, this approach will utilize the campuswide touch-panel user interface for uniformity and ease of use. Some of the audio requirements will use BIAMP equipment with DANTE (Digital Audio Network Through Ethernet) to transmit audio via the network. Microphones and other audio equipment will leverage DANTE to distribute audio throughout a room or the building.

Most rooms in The Kendeda Building will require users to Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD).  The two classrooms rooms and the auditorium will have fixed computers. Document cameras will be provided, but not connected to the AV system to save energy.  If users need a document camera, they can easily connect it to the HDMI connection in the rooms.  This connection will be available for all HDMI sources, to include but not limited to laptops, document cameras, and tablets.

Laser projectors, manufactured by Sony, are being used in the rooms. These projectors consume less power than standard lamp projectors providing the same lumen output. Approximately 5 years ago, these laser projectors became the standard across campus and there are currently 370 installed on campus. Several rooms will also have built-in cameras and microphones for web-conferencing and lecture capture via the BYOD or the installed computer in the two classrooms and auditorium.

The core of the AV solution will be located in the network closet.  It will comprise of one main AV rack that will manage all the AV solutions for each room.  Since the network closet will be properly conditioned for the networking equipment, it will be an ideal environment for the main AV rack. 

Moving Forward

During the first full year of operation, the team will evaluate the AV solutions and adjust as needed. As The Kendeda Building is transforming how we work, the team plans to take these AV design ideas to the rest of campus in an effort to increase energy efficiency in all of Georgia Tech’s facilities.

Georgia Tech is no stranger to being a leader. From academics to research, making strides and raising the standard is something that Georgia Tech does—we create the next. An area where Georgia Tech has been “creating the next” for years is in our green cleaning practices. Led by the Facilities Management Building Services Associate Director Tommy Little, the Green Cleaning program is innovative and an amazing asset. Both private and public organizations visit Georgia Tech to learn more about our program and how to implement it in their locations. As the name suggests, a green cleaning program would seemingly have a natural fit into the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design.

Servicing The Kendeda Building

As a Living Building Challenge certified facility, The Kendeda Building must be maintained in such a way that it does not harm the environment while also maintaining top standards – including cleanliness. Items of consideration include the cleaning products that are used, the cleaning materials that are used (paper towels, toilet tissue, trashcan liners, etc.), and the equipment that is utilized. The Building Services team quickly rose to the challenge of servicing The Kendeda Building. The Georgia Tech Green Cleaning program was a natural fit for this building.

A New Way to Clean

Often when one considers “clean” you think of all germs and pathogens being removed usually at the expense of using of harsh chemicals. These harsh chemicals are just that—harsh. Their use can be detrimental to the staff who use them, to the building user who interact with them, and to the environment.

The philosophy adopted by Georgia Tech Building Services is to clean for the health of the person. This means considering how the substances used impacts everyone. The green cleaning program Georgia Tech Building Services began developing in 2003 cleans in an entirely different way, without the use of harsh chemicals. The latest step in the ongoing program evolution was having the program independently certified by GreenSeal, an internationally recognized third-party certification that verifies every step in the cleaning process to assure the protection of human and environmental health, on-going inspections, waste reduction and more.

The Building Services’ green cleaning program utilizes ionized (or charged) water in combination with different minerals, including salt, to clean surfaces. When the ionized water is mixed with minerals it is doubly tested by staff to ensure it is the proper pH for cleaning. This system is able to clean to a standard and level that far exceeds the use of traditional cleaners such as bleach or degreasers. The results are outstanding—for example, the sanitizer is 80-200 times stronger than bleach with none of the harmful side effects. Additionally, all paper-towels are 100 percent post-recycled content.

Cleaning The Kendeda Building

Every substance, ranging from the building materials to the cleaning solutions, that goes into The Kendeda Building has to be carefully sourced. As part of the certification process, Georgia Tech submitted a list to the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) of all the substances employed in our buildings. ILFI reviewed all of the substances to look for those that would not be suitable to go into the building. The ILFI report found that many of the substances already utilized by Building Services are a natural fit and do not pose any concerns. Despite the overwhelmingly positive findings about the Green Cleaning system, there remained a few challenges for the team. Since everything has to be vetted that comes into the building, the team is in the search for trashcan liners and hand-soaps that will align with the standards shared by the building. They also have to consider the energy usage of the cleaning solutions system, and possibly initiating different training requirements.

Cleaning at Home

As with many techniques being explored with the Living Building Challenge, this special way of cleaning can be incorporated into our own homes. We are all invited to review the “red list” products identified by ILFI to see if anything we bring into our home presents an area for concern. Research will reveal alternatives and different products that we can be substituted to lessen the impact on our health and environment. Additionally, we are invited to look into ionized water home cleaning systems. Small changes can make great impacts!

Links

 

Professors Marc Weissburg and Emily Weigel from the School of Biological Sciences, along with Georgia Tech students, are studying the impact buildings and construction have on biodiversity in the ecosystem.

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The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design will be surrounded by an impressive amount of green space (40,237 square feet) - fitting for a Living Building. Every element of The Kendeda Building’s construction and future operation is challenging Georgia Tech to rethink how things are “always done,” and landscaping maintenance is no exception.  

The Landscape Pilot Project

Per the International Living Future Institute, the organization that manages the Living Building Challenge, to achieve Living Building Challenge 3.1 certification, The Kendeda Building must be designed to operate at a "net-positive energy and water and to maintain the landscape" without using the conventional methods of "pesticides and fertilizer but with native plants only.” To prepare for this element of the Living Building Challenge, a team, led by Georgia Tech Associate Director of Landscape Services and Fleet Services Hyacinth Ide, conducted a 12-month long pilot project to assess:

  • Combustion-free maintenance equipment
  • Weed, disease, and insect control without the use of petrochemical-based products
  • Irrigation from only non-potable water sources
  • Soil moisture monitoring
  • Composting 100 percent of landscape waste

To understand the operational impacts of the certification, grounds located near the site of the Kendeda Building were subdivided into four test plots. Each of the plots were roughly equal in size, though there was some size variation. No special vegetation was brought into the test plots—what was already growing was what was tested. The test plots were surrounded by gravel, and this helped prevent (additional) weeds from migrating to the area.

The variables tested at the different plots were mechanical/hand weeding (weeding using strictly hand tools or just hands), battery-powered tools powered with rechargeable batteries, and the use of an organic herbicide to kill weeds.

The four test plots were maintained with the following, different standards:

  1. Plot 1:  Control (no treatment or maintenance); flora was ornamental grass – 656 sq. ft.
  2. Plot 2:  Mechanical/hand weeding only; flora was ornamental grass – 390 sq. ft.
  3. Plot 3:  Mechanical/hand weeding and battery powered tools only; flora was ornamental grass – 485 sq. ft.
  4. Plot 4:  Mechanical/hand weeding, battery powered tools, organic herbicide (Avenger Organic Weed Killer, an herbicide that uses concentrated citrul oil), and mulch; flora was ornamental grass, shrub, and Ball Cypress Tree – 860 sq. ft.

Additionally, two turf area treatment plots were maintained in the following methods:

  1. Plot 1: Battery powered mower, line trimmer, organic weed control/fertilizer – 480 sq. ft.
  2. Plot 2: Battery powered mower, line trimmer, no weed control, no fertilizer – 480 sq. ft.

Pushing through the Weeds

The intent of the pilot project was for Georgia Tech to develop a plan for how landscape services will operate on The Kendeda Building grounds. Atlanta receives both a lot of sunshine and plenty of rain—these factors combine to create an environment where plants grow quickly. Challenges the team encountered included:

  • The selection of an effective organic herbicide;
  • Staffing time realized when plots were maintained with hand tools versus traditional and battery powered tools; and
  • Equipment failure.

The team discovered that Avenger Organics Weed Killer does not effectively kill weeds. As a result, more hand-weeding will be required, and a much broader variety of local and non-native plants may be able to propagate on the site. “A weed is simply a plant that is not wanted in a specific location. Therefore, at The Kendeda Building, we are going to have to be more accepting of a naturalized landscape, one that may include plants reminiscent of a wild meadow,” explained Ide.

The team also found the battery-powered equipment was not as robust as what the landscaping crew was accustomed to using. The majority of battery-powered landscape equipment was made for personal, residential use and not commercial use. It was also discovered that to use battery-powered equipment, staff must be prepared to have multiple batteries on hand, as the battery-life of the test equipment did not last through the duration of the required tasks. As a result of this pilot program, the Landscape Services Department is requesting to purchase a mobile solar-charging station to charge the electric tools that will be used to maintain the area.

Rethinking our Process and Sharing What we Learned

Robert Paltz, a member of the Landscape team shared, “A challenge is just an opportunity to rethink things.” The findings by the team have influenced decisions for The Kendeda Building landscaping. The most common messages discovered throughout this project are the importance of education and a willingness to rethink how we operate.

The landscaping at The Kendeda Building will look different than other landscaped areas of campus—a situation witnessed at site visits to other Living Buildings. It will be necessary to address landscaping expectations and to educate the Georgia Tech community that the landscaping at The Kendeda Building will look different – by design – than other areas on campus. It cannot be said that one landscaping style is better than another; they are inherently different. Different appearances require different maintenance, and with differences come particular benefits and challenges. One clear benefit from this style of landscaping is that the area will be primed to be richer in wildlife and pollinators, raising the biodiversity on campus.

Operational learnings from the pilots continue to advance. A specialized horticulturist will be brought on to maintain The Kendeda Building site and will be able to not only maintain the area but also to share on-going learnings and educational information to both visitors and other staff members.

Using this Information at Home

The findings of this project can go past The Kendeda Building and into our homes. Ide explained, “Organic and low environmental impact gardening practices are important and should be applied any time it is possible. It is actually easier to maintain a home or personal garden utilizing the above methods than it is to maintain a commercial area.”

A few tips to incorporate as you are planning a more sustainable garden:

  • Plant selection – carefully research and select the plants for your garden, remembering to consider sun-needs, migration tendencies, native plant selection, and maintenance needs.
  • Mulch helps reduce the proliferation of weeds; mulch also needs to be periodically replaced as it breaks down into soil.
  • Remember that you have to be committed to maintaining a landscape in this way ­– consistent and frequent weeding is necessary.

Links:

The Living Building is like any living organism; it must use its resources wisely. Led by Dr. Michael Chang of the Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems and Dr. Dana Hartley of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, this pilot project for The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design creates an innovative building dashboard system for The Kendeda Building – one that allows building occupants and managers to know in real-time how the building is managing and utilizing its resources.

Ten Georgia Tech undergraduates were selected as the inaugural (2017-2018) class of Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF). The undergraduates represent all six colleges at Georgia Tech and were selected from a group of 88 applicants. After being selected, the team was quick to get to work.

A New Direction

A challenge to think differently is a hallmark of The Kendeda Building, and the students rose to the occasion. The SURF team’s first decision was to break out of the confines of “the screen” as the medium for communicating information and knowledge about the fitness and function of the building. The students considered many different ways to convey information and to immerse visitors in the “Living Building experience.” Among the methods the group discussed included using ambient lighting, sound, or color to convey if the building was “happy” or “sad.” Another idea required users to complete an action or participate in a game in order to receive a reward (like energy to power their phones or laptops, or to get a free coffee). The brainstorming time was productive, and the students were left with many ideas to work through.

Having generated many ideas, the SURF team had to pause and develop a set of values by which they could evaluate their ideas. They settled on four values that any system they ultimately produced should adhere to:

  1. It should be sustainable;
  2. It should be inclusive of the whole Living Building community;
  3. It should be educational (and not just entertaining); and
  4. It should accurately report and represent the underlying data/phenomena.

The team was also challenged to develop an overarching theme or narrative that would unite their selected concepts.

Continued Progress

Members of the initial team are continuing to work on the project. One next step includes the development of communications materials (primarily short videos) that help explain who they are and what they are trying to accomplish. Students are also obtaining building data from other buildings that can be used to begin developing a virtual prototype of one or more of their concepts. Finally, the students are proposing a way to capture data directly at the Living Building construction site about the geographic origin of workers, visitors, and materials that come or are brought to the site.

Resources:

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design has the intention of becoming a resource for and model of sustainable design for the Southeast. This necessitated feedback from the community even in the design phase. One way to collect feedback is through crowdsourcing methods. But how do you crowdsource information for a building that has not yet been constructed?

Dr. John E. Taylor, the Frederick Law Olmstead Professor of the Georgia Tech School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and his dynamic research team were charged with creating interactive virtual and augmented reality viewers to collect user information for the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design.

Creating an Experience for a Building Not Yet Built

Dr. Taylor and the team quickly identified that there was not necessarily a one-size-fits-all virtual reality platform for crowdsourcing. In response to this observation, they created three different iterations of crowdsourcing platforms. Each of the platforms had their own benefits and challenges.

The three viewers were:

  1. The augmented reality viewer is tied to the user’s GPS location and places users in the building if they are at the building site. Using an iPad or iPhone, users walking around the site see the building superimposed over the camera’s view, as if they are walking through the building. When the building was in the pre-construction stage and still had a colorful parking lot, this was an engaging way to interact with the building. Now that the building is under construction, access to the site is more restricted­–making the augmented reality viewer difficult to deploy to collect user feedback. As users shared feedback about a particular area they could tie their comments to a specific location and identify what Living Building Petal to which their feedback pertains.
  2. A 360-degree viewer allows users to experience 360-degree views of the building and its surroundings from a set of pre-defined locations on the site using a mobile device. Like the augmented reality viewer, as users share feedback about a particular area, they can tie their comments to a specific location and identify the Petal to which their feedback pertains.
  3. A full immersion virtual reality viewer enables users to experience and walk through the building and the site surrounding the building before it is built with no limitations imposed by construction on the actual site nor limitations on what parts of the building or site they may visit. Participants can even experience the building in different weather conditions, and the full immersion experience gives people the opportunity to interact with the building before it is built. The full immersion program requires a VR headset.

 

A Popular Response to Finding a Meaningful Experience

As mentioned above, one of the early obstacles overcome by Dr. Taylor and his research team was the realization that there was not one virtual reality platform that optimally meets every feedback requirement. This suite of virtual reality experiences allowed for project stakeholders to collect more community information and feedback. As the purpose of the reality viewers is to capture community feedback, it is beneficial to tailor the viewer to the specific type of feedback desired to help ensure a meaningful user experience. The system also collects demographic information from the users. This is an important feature as the Living Building team works to ensure that diverse feedback is collected - and, if feedback is implemented, design changes are equitable for all.

An additional challenge encountered by Dr. Taylor and the team has been the extremely positive reaction from the community! He and his team have been very busy trying to fulfill the various request to present their technology to individuals and groups across campus and the greater Atlanta community.

Next steps for the project include developing methods to analyze the data, analyzing the data and experiential information collected thus far, and then publishing what they have learned about the best platforms to crowdsource design feedback.

Resources:

 

One of the seven petals of the Living Building Challenge, the fulfillment of the Equity Petal requires a demonstration that the building supports a just and equitable world. The Equity Petal defines this as “a society that embraces all sectors of humanity and allows the dignity of equal access and fair treatment is a civilization in the best position to make decisions that protect and restore the natural environment that sustains all of us.” To bring a student voice and perspective to this petal's challenge, a diverse mix of undergraduate and graduate students from disciplines across the campus were selected to form the Living Building Equity Champions (LBECs). This group was charged with fully engaging in the development and realization of the Equity Petal of The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design. This group was led by Georgia Tech Institute Diversity’s Dr. Keona Lewis, Program Review and Research Manager, and Atira Rochester, Corporate Relations Manager, and supported by the Academic and Research Council and Serve-Learn-Sustain.  

The LBECs were exposed to relevant experiences and brought an invaluable perspective to the table. They attended numerous discussions and opportunities to expand their understanding of and exposure to the Atlanta community. They took the opportunity to represent at targeted-minority events and gain exposure to groups who are not well represented at Georgia Tech. From these experiences, the LBECs were able to bring a more comprehensive perspective to equity discussions. The champions could speak for and represent groups not typically represented.

Experiences of an LBEC

Challenges presented to LBECs included:

  • Providing input and feedback to the design and development of The Kendeda Building;
  • Engaging current students in the Kendeda Building’s equity, sustainability, and diversity efforts; and
  • Connecting The Kendeda Building with the greater Atlanta community, particularly K-12 students.

The group quickly found that compared to the other petals (Place, Energy, Water, Materials, Health & Happiness, and Beauty), it was often difficult to generate conversation and initiate efforts around the Equity Petal. Pushing past this challenge meant the Champions had to work to ensure their voices were heard just as loudly as those discussing The Kendeda Building’s water or energy usage. The experiences of the LBECs also generated conversations with tough questions and tough answers. These real answers have been powerful in both explaining and working towards a more equitable building and Georgia Tech.

The group of LBECs were challenged to continually expand their perspective and to engage with the Equity Petal at a deeper level. This group pushed The Kendeda Building team to realize how important it was to have student’s voices in the conversation. The group realized that coming to the table with less information than others had on the project was a disadvantage. Champions had to be taught the information to be able to be active participants in the conversation.

What the Champions Realized

The champions are influencing The Kendeda Building for the better by positively impacting our conversations about the Equity Petal of The Living Building Challenge. The champion’s presence and efforts highlights the importance an individual’s presence can make and that a student’s time in college is a very individualized experience. This individual experience can cause students to inadvertently be unaware of unequitable conditions at Tech and in the community. Equity is an issue that pertains to every individual, and greater awareness can spark positive change.

While the LBECs are influencing the design for the better, they too are benefiting from the experience. Their understanding of equity has been elevated to a higher and more empowering level. And the team has come to truly appreciate the importance of having a seat at the table and being an informed voice in a sea of voices. The Kendeda Building will help facilitate crucial conversations like these in the Equity realm.

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design will have an impact far greater than the Georgia Tech community—it is meant to transform the entire Southeastern United States. One way to impact our region, and in particular our state, is to engage with K-12 schools. These students are the next generation of thinkers and doers who will one day be responsible for upholding the principles of the Living Building Challenge. Georgia Tech's Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing's (CEISMC) Sabrina Grossman, Program Director in Science Education, and Mike Helms, CEISMC Research Scientist worked with Amanda Reding, a participant in the GIFT Program, to create an outreach curriculum pertaining to The Kendeda Building. This curriculum connects the State of Georgia’s teaching standards directly with biologically-inspired elements of the Living Building Challenge to help guide students’ understanding of how nature and science can help solve the many challenges of achieving Living Building Challenge certification. By state standards into the lessons, this curriculum provides an easily accessible path for students across Georgia to “visit” the building without ever leaving their classroom.

Overcoming Obstacles
Elementary, middle, and high school teachers are faced with rigorous, state-mandated grade-level teaching requirements that they have to fulfill on an expedited time-table. This requirement makes it a challenge for educators to adopt a special lesson plan unless it directly connects with their mandated teaching requirements. Knowing this, Sabrina, Mike, and Amanda sifted through the volume of content pertaining to the Living Building Challenge and found connections to the state curriculum mandates.  The connections forged between the Living Building Challenge requirements and state requirements demonstrated the presence of the inherent biology and nature within The Kendeda Building.

Making The Kendeda Building Accessible to Students
One petal of the Living Building Challenge is Equity, and included within Equity is accessibility – or rather the ability for all to engage with and enjoy the building. The Kendeda Building is not only meant for Georgia Tech but for the entire Southeast. The classroom content produced by CEISMC, in keeping with the Equity Petal accessibility requirement, needed to be available to students across the state of Georgia. The lesson plans and materials will be free of charge to any teacher and accessible through the internet. Additionally, John Thornton, Academic Professional and Coordinator of the Video Production Lab in the College of Ivan Allen, is creating video content that will feature the building and provide an additional element of being able to “visit” the building from afar. Another tool being designed within the School of Industrial and System Engineering are cards that demonstrate the biologically-inspired building blocks of the building. These cards will be an additional visualization tool to engage students.

The first iteration of the curriculum “Animals in Action” – written for the 7th grade –  is currently being tested with plans to adapt the curriculum for 6th and 8th grade students. Eventually all grades from kindergarten through 12th grade will have a one-week long science lesson plan that directly connects grade level curriculum to the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design.

Because these materials are available for teachers state-wide, students in rural Georgia who may never have the opportunity to travel to Atlanta will still be able to “visit” and engage with the Kendeda building!  

November 2 marked the beginning of the construction phase of The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design. Formerly referred to as the Living Building at Georgia Tech, the project is on track to become the first Living Building Challenge 3.1-certified facility of its size and function in the Southeast.

The building launch took place at the northwest corner of Ferst Drive and State Street and featured representatives from Georgia Tech and The Kendeda Fund, the project’s philanthropic donor. Play video.

Auditorium

The educational opportunities are not limited to the classrooms and makerspace. As part of its mission to serve as a public forum for educational activities, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design also features an auditorium that will seat 170 persons.

As with other programmable areas in The Kendeda Building, the auditorium will support flexible use of space. The structural system will consist of mixture of wood, concrete and steel. Wood is a preferred material due to its aesthetics, low carbon footprint, and regional availability — all of which are important variables to Living Building Challenge certification. While steel and concrete won’t be eliminated entirely, these materials will only be used strategically where needed for structural support.

The design team has also taken great strides to incorporate salvaged materials (including granite, slate, and wood) from recent construction projects on campus.

Offices

Offices on the first floor support the academic and research activities conducted in The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design. In addition to a building manager and administrative support, the building will also house the faculty teaching in the building during the semester. Courses taught in the Living Building will be alternated throughout the academic year to maximize exposure to the student community. As temporary occupants of the building, faculty will reserve their office space on an as needed-bases. This “hoteling” concept has become popular in the past two decades as a means to accommodate the ever-increasingly dynamic and mobile workforce.

The office space configuration will incorporate an open floor plan to support flexible use of space. As with the lobby and outdoor programmable area, seating will consist of a mix of fixed and movable furniture to enable the occupants to maximize the use of space. 

Makerspace

Makerspaces are becoming increasingly popular on Georgia Tech’s campus as students receive hands-on experiential learning opportunities to build and test the concepts they have designed in the classroom. Notably, Georgia Tech’s student-run Invention Studio dates back to 2009 when a group of Capstone Design students gathered to run a facility and provide prototyping instruction to other students in exchange for 24-hour access to the facility. Today, this 4,500 square foot makerspace is open to students, faculty and staff across campus and houses more than $1 million in tools and equipment.

To accommodate the demand, other makerspace concepts are springing up on campus. The Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering (AE) Aero Maker Space  opened in late 2016 and houses laser-cutters and 3D printers for AE students. 

 
Class Labs

Much like the classrooms, the 24-person class labs are designed to foster active learning by using The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design as a teaching tool. Due to the requirement for the building to be net-positive energy, power operated equipment will be very limited. Proposed programs are being developed to support the goals and learning outcomes of the Living Building Challenge.

The class labs will be located on the first and second floors and can be accessed via the central collaborative commons space.

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Classrooms

Designed to function as a true living, learning laboratory, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design will help educate and transform future generations of thinkers and doers to not only create a more sustainable environment, but one that actually gives back and improves the environment. The Kendeda Building will feature two 75-person classrooms to provide hands-on educational and learning opportunities. Classrooms will be located on the second floor and can be accessed via the centrally located collaborative commons space. ­­­­­

As of fall 2017, several multidisciplinary curriculum proposals from across campus are being evaluated. Many of these classes will also leverage the instructional laboratories and makerspace located in The Kendeda Building. The flexible, open space will enable students and faculty to engage in problem based learning exercises that will explore and teach the principles of sustainability.   

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Porch

No southern dwelling would be complete without its porch, and The Kendeda Building for Sustainable Design is no exception. Shaded by the PV canopy above, the porch of the building bridges the physical building to the surrounding landscape – eventually connecting and integrating with the proposed campus eco-commons.  

The porch also serves as a point of entry to the building, accessible by all through several entry points.

The outdoor porch area (2,618 square feet) houses several functional systems designed specifically to assist in the management of stormwater. Following the natural moderate slope from north to south, the porch terraces, or steps down, at appropriate elevations. This geometry accommodates cascading porch areas that support substantial volume storage underneath the permeable pavers. Unlike a traditional stormwater management approach that concentrates water storage in a single area, this method of managing rainwater relies upon dispersed locations along the sloped site in order to leverage gravity to assist in controlling the flow of water. 

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Edible Landscape

The landscape surrounding The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design must navigate competing performance demands for rain water management, passive building cooling, tree protection, healthy ecology, and urban agriculture, while providing adequate space for human occupancy and year-round seasonal character.

Given The Kendeda Building’s anticipated building density or floor-to-area-ratio (FAR), 20 percent of the project area, or approximately 12,600 square feet, will be dedicated to fostering a healthy, accessible food system.

The bulk of the urban agriculture area requirement will be met with a 5,350 square foot shade-to-partial shade edible ground landscape. Trees, shrubs, and groundcovers that produce edibles, accompanied by informative signage, will encourage students, staff, and visitors to pick and eat tree fruit and berries year-round. This landscape will also work seamlessly with the landscape’s adjacent, proposed mesic woodland and seepage wetland zones to manage stormwater runoff from the site’s pavement. Additionally, this type of production requires far less sunlight and maintenance than intensive agriculture and can thrive within a sloped, shaded landscape.

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Rainwater and Greywater Treatment Equipment

Achieving net positive water is one of the major imperatives of Living Building Challenge 3.1 certification. The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design will collect­ – and appropriately treat – the water that it collects on site in order to provide the water needed for irrigation, potable water (i.e. safe to drink), and the small amount of water needed for the composting toilettes. 

To achieve net positive water, the following strategies are planned to collect and recycle both rainwater and greywater (waste water from sinks and showers) on site.  

Harvest and treat rooftop rainwater to supply all potable demands for the building.

  • Rainwater from approximately 18,000 SF of rooftop will be filtered and disinfected. A 50,000 gallon cistern stores water to overcome drought and provide water resiliency.
  • The cistern system harvests approximately 41% of the annual rooftop runoff; the balance is managed on site.

Manage waste water on site by using a greywater treatment system and composting toilets.

  • Greywater and condensate will be used to supply the majority of irrigation demand on the site. Any makeup needed can be drawn from the cistern provided that water is available.
  • Finished compost and compost tea (leachate) will be periodically removed and used onsite, on campus, or in a regional facility that produces beneficial byproducts (compost, fertilizer).

Provide onsite filtration of stormwater.

  • Overflows from the rainwater and condensate systems will join stormwater management systems on the site.
  • Approximately 59% of the annual rooftop runoff will overflow from the cistern to onsite stormwater systems.
Rainwater Cistern

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design must collect more water than it consumes on an annual basis to function as a net positive water facility – one of the many requirements to achieve Living Building Challenge 3.1 certification. Due to the humid and rainy conditions in the Southeast (Atlanta receives a level of rainfall every year that is on par with Seattle), the building is expected to harvest 460,000 gallons of water a year. To hold all this water, the building will house a 50,000-gallon cistern in the basement of the building. 

Like all living things, the cistern will need to replenish itself and will do so by collecting rainwater from the roof.  Overflow for the system is designed to work with the natural slope of the topography to most effectively manage the volume and rate of water flowing throughout the site. These systems include a stormwater raingarden and trickle filter under the porch plaza as well as a series of constructed wetlands and edible landscape areas with subsurface infiltration. In addition, there will be rainwater catchments on the roof of the building to collect stormwater before it reaches the ground. 

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Interior Floor

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Entrance from Ferst Drive

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Clerestory Windows

Dating back to early Christine Byzantine architecture, clerestory windows are popular for their ability to unobtrusively deliver natural light to large interior spaces. In The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design, clerestory windows will be installed at the roof of the two-story atrium to provide ample daylight and natural ventilation to the open space below. Considered a rather simple design technique, these windows will help reduce the need for electrically-powered artificial lighting and air conditioning which will greatly contribute to the building’s net positive energy requirement. 

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Photovoltaic Canopy

To achieve Living Building Challenge 3.1 certification, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design must function at net positive energy – meaning it must harvest more energy (in this case via photovoltaic panels) than it consumes. Like all living things, The Kendeda Building will need to “sleep” in order to restore its energy reserves. Currently, the plans are to make the building available for occupancy a total of 16 hours a day with variable access after 5 p.m. 

Based upon this rate of occupancy and a variety of interconnected variables, the building’s Energy Use Intensity (EUI) is expected to be 34, which is 66 percent more efficient that your average building of the same size and occupancy. While this certainly helps contribute to the net positive energy goals for the building, any variation that impacts the intake or output of energy will alter the building’s performance.       

The solar array capacity on the Living Building at Georgia Tech will need to produce 367,000 kWh (approximately) based on the targeted 34 EUI.

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Roof Garden

Like most spaces in The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design, the rooftop garden will serve many purposes and help contribute to the building’s performance. The 5,347 square foot rooftop garden will consist of a honeybee apiary, pollinator garden, and blueberry orchard. These elements will help satisfy a portion of the Living Building Challenge’s Urban Agriculture Petal requirement while simultaneously offering valuable curriculum and research opportunities.

Of the rooftop’s total square footage, 1,000 square feet will be public space. This unique space will also assist in reconnecting students, faculty, and visitors with their food system by modeling a sustainable and productive infrastructure that supports pollinators and pollinator habitat conservation awareness.

Functionally, the rooftop garden will contain rainwater catchments to help manage stormwater runoff, while shade provided by the photovoltaic canopy will help mitigate the urban heat island effect.

 

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The Living Building at Georgia Tech has reached a major milestone, with the approval of the schematic design. Approved by Georgia Tech’s Planning and Design Commission in December, the schematic design essentially provides a working blueprint for what is anticipated to be the most environmentally advanced research and educational building ever constructed in the Southeast. Read More

The Living Building at Georgia Tech crosses an end-of-the-year threshold Wednesday as the building’s architects present their proposed schematic design to the university’s Planning and Design Commission. Read More

Start Schematic Design Phase

Sept 2016  

Since last fall, when the notion of developing a Living Building on Georgia Tech’s campus became a reality, there has been a flurry of planning activities that have involved a variety of stakeholders on campus and beyond to help ensure the success of this transformative project. Read More

The Georgia Institute of Technology has received a commitment for $30 million from The Kendeda Fund to build what is expected to become the most environmentally advanced education and research building ever constructed in the Southeast. The investment represents The Kendeda Fund’s largest single grant and ranks among the largest capital gifts ever received by Georgia Tech. Read More

The Georgia Institute of Technology has selected the team of Lord Aeck Sargent and The Miller Hull Partnership to design the Institute’s Living Building Challenge 3.0 project. The final team was selected after three teams participated in an ideas competition to explore all the possibilities and challenges of designing this certified project, set to be constructed on the Georgia Tech campus beginning in 2017. Read More

Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the Georgia Institute of Technology is a leading research university committed to improving the human condition through advanced science and technology.

student life at georgia techRanked as the #7 best public university, Georgia Tech provides a focused, technologically based education to more than 21,500 undergraduate and graduate students.

Georgia Tech has many nationally recognized programs, all top-ranked by peers and publications alike, and is ranked in the nation’s top 10 public universities by U.S. News and World Report.

Degrees are offered through the colleges of Architecture, Computing, Engineering, Sciences, the Scheller College of Business, and the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

The strong academic work ethic at Tech is balanced by a collegiate atmosphere incorporating both intercollegiate and intramural sports, campus traditions, and some 400 student organizations.

Alongside their academic achievements, Tech students are also active in the community, earning a well-rounded education through community service activities.

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  • Location: The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design (See Campus Map)
  • Mailing Address: The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design
                                 Georgia Institute of Technology
                                 422 Ferst Drive NW
                                 Atlanta, GA 30332-4019
  • Campus Mail Stop:  4019

Directory

  • Shan Arora, Director for The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design
    Contact information: shan.arora@gatech.edu, (404) 894-9289
  • If you have issues with the building's A/V system, please call the A/V Services Team at 404-894-4669. Assistance is available Monday - Friday from 7am to 8pm.
  • Rachael Pocklington, Senior Marketing Communications Specialist
    Contact information: rpocklington@gatech.edu, (404) 385-4142

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